Posts Tagged ‘salons’

Grow Income With Eyelash-Enhancing Services

by Megan Dorcey on Monday, June 28th, 2010

Kim Kardashian sparks the most envy with me when it comes to beauty.  Of course, the starlet has the perfect skin tone and luscious locks, but she also has the most stunning eyelashes!  I know that she is genetically blessed with Armenian features that I (pale-skinned, red hair, freckles, etc.) will never have naturally.  I like to pride myself on the fact that I have been a take-charge woman who doesn’t take “no” for an answer.  So instead of accepting this as my fate, I began seeking out ways to not so naturally enhance some of my features with inspiration from Ms. Kardashian.

Eyelash extensions are becomming such a hot trend among the beauty community, I can no longer ignore it.  In fact, I am willing to embrace this trend, and after doing some research I am one step closer.  When my esthetician first said to me, “You have gorgeous lashes, but you would look great with some extensions,” I was clueless.  She began to tell me about lash extensions, and to be honest; every single one of my girliest dreams started looking more like reality.  I am an advertiser’s dream—purchasing every single lash-enhancing mascara and tool I see in the makeup aisles.  What if enhancing my lashes a little more permanently would rid me of the constant barrage of goopy wands almost completely?

I finally decided that I was going to do some research on the matter and stumbled upon a few different products.  Salons and beauty stores are starting to carry an alternative to the lash extensions such as Lash Food’s natural eyelash and eyebrow conditioning stimulators that would provide longer, darker, and stronger lashes.  This line of products is different from prescription-only Latisse, in the sense that it will not cause any kind of side effects. The ingredients are all natural and consumers can purchase it from you, rather than having to get it at a pharmacy.

If you want more of an instant gratification, JB Cosmetics also offers lash extensions and lash-curling services.  The curling, or “Simple Perm”, as they have dubbed it, is a short procedure that gives lashes the same effect a lash curler would, only semi-permanently.  Another lash extension service by NovaLash offers training to stylists everywhere so that you, too, can be on the cutting edge of the beauty world, as well as build revenue in the process.

Lashes are playing a major role in the beauty and fashion industry.  A site called Paperself.com has taken lash art to a whole new level by offering fashion-forward adhesive lashes that are made out of paper.  This just goes to show that beauty conscious consumers are ready to bat their lashes at a new wave of beauty products.  How can you, as a stylist, cash in on the lash craze?  Do your research on topical treatments as well as extensions and see which one would fit in with your clientele.

Kim Kardashian may have been born with beautiful lashes, but it’s comforting to know that I—and your clients—can join the club whenever I want!

Re-Book Your Client With Celeb-Worthy Hair Accessories!

by Megan Dorcey on Monday, June 21st, 2010

The mercury is rising and we all know what that means: less is more in the clothing department.  Coping with the heat can take a client’s wardrobe choices and cut it in half.  So what should you suggest to add some glitz and glam without adding unwanted layers and heavy jewelery?  Hair accessories.

The days of stick straight hair are long gone.  Everyone from that gorgeous model on the runway, to your favorite celebrity, to the girl next door is sporting something pretty in her wavy ‘do.  Sparkly brooch-inspired clips, glitzy headbands, and simple up-do tools are popping up all over the hair scene.

This is a very quick and simple way to offer an option to your client and they will be so happy with her style that she won’t hesitate to re-book her next appointment before walking out the door.  Simply suggest she bring her favorite hair accessory along to her cut or color and offer to style it in a fun way that they may not have thought of.  This will only take a few extra minutes and ensure a returning client.  If your client doesn’t have a favorite accessory, stock up on a few trendy and inexpensive pieces that she can take home.  Making your client feel special when she walks out the door will mean the world to her, and don’t worry-she will tell her friends how much fun they had with you!

Is your client hesitant to add an accessory?  Try a summer-friend celeb craze such as the messy braid or face-framing braids that are a simple way to transform their look.

Need some hair accessory inspiration?  Pictured are a couple of my favorites that work perfect in waves, curls, kinks, and coils.

Beach Waves, Keratin, and Curls…Oh My!

by Megan Dorcey on Tuesday, June 8th, 2010

The Pravana Beach Wave

It’s (finally) summer time and although we are all excited about the warming trends, there is something more important that needs our attention: the hair trends. With every season comes a little something different and with beach vacations, pool parties, and everything in between, one trend that is sticking this summer season is the beachy wave. You can catch it everywhere from a Derek Lam runway show to this year’s MTV movie awards. So how do you, as a stylist, cash in on this trend? Do your homework!

Classes all over the country are being offered on a regular basis to help tame the frizzies and promote beautiful waves. Two educational endeavors that will ensure your pocket book success: keratin treatments and the beach wave.

Although many curl pro’s are leery about the keratin treatments, they really are hitting the market hard and curls of all kind are demanding the frizz-reducing treatment. So many of us curlies are at wit’s end during the humid summer months and these treatments are a saving grace! There are many different options when choosing a treatment: Braziliante, Brazilian Blowout, De Fabulous, Global Keratin, La Brasiliana, and the list goes on. The point is, research the products and understand what they offer your potential client.

As for the beach wave, this is a new spin on the “perm” which gives those of the non-curly persuasion a better option when it comes to wash-and-wear hair styles. This treatment gives clients a sense of freedom from their blow driers and flat irons, and letting them fit right in with the summer beach feel that everyone strives to achieve. The company standing at the forefront of the beach wave craze is Pravana. They offer Q&A’s on their site as well as class schedules (they will be on the east coast this summer so check out their schedule to get the nearest class information).

Need more exposure? Tons of stylists are already gaining new curly clients through NaturallyCurly.com’s advertising program. With well over 500,000 visits to the site each month, it’s a great way to grab the attention of the curly community. They will post an ad on the salon reviews section in your state so all of the curlies can find you! Make sure your salon is listed for all to find.

Crystal Wright

I am constantly speaking with stylists across the country about what they are doing in their salons to gain more exposure. I would love to hear what you are doing! Have questions about a certain brand/treatment/trend? Go ahead and email me your questions and comments!

Now to leave you all with a few words of wisdom from stylist and beauty guru Crystal Wright about building your business and client base. I prodded Crystal for a few tips for the CurlStylist audience while at the Mizani Forum in Houston. Her advice is precious, so listen up!

MD What are some of the biggest mistakes you see stylists making today?

CW: They don’t know what they don’t know. What I mean is, sometimes stylists don’t realize that they are working in a vacuum with only the limited information they have in their heads about a subject. Whether it’s working behind the scenes, opening up a new salon, adding a new employee, or choosing the furniture for your salon environment, in order to do it right it’s important to read your trades, do your homework, and seek the advice of people who know more than you and who can help you get to the next level even if it costs a little money. Rest assured that I have been penny wise and pound foolish. I’ve learned that the right book, or paying the right person for 30 minutes of advice can save thousands of dollars and so much time. I learned to call someone up and say “Can I buy 20 minutes of your time”.

MD: What is one key piece of advice you can give to someone wanting to change their lives professionally and personally?

CW: Just one! Ahh shucks. Plan to work and work the plan. That’s the advice that my sales manager at Xerox gave me over 20 years ago and it still works. The only time I falter is when I don’t have a plan. A real plan. One that’s written down on paper with a date from which you can work backwards. That date becomes an appointment that you have to keep, and it makes you accountable to yourself.

MD: Can I have two?

CW: Stop trying to fix everything that isn’t working all at once. You don’t have to do everything all at once. When you identify the things that aren’t working (personally or professionally) in your life you don’t have to fix them all next month. Fix one thing every 30 days.

Salon Outlook Positive in Q3

by Michelle Breyer on Thursday, October 29th, 2009

q3 salon outlook

The outlook for the salon/spa industry remained positive in the third quarter, as the Professional Beauty Association’s (PBA) Salon/Spa Performance Index (SSPI) rose for the second consecutive quarter. The SSPI — a quarterly composite index that tracks the health of and outlook for the U.S. salon/spa industry — stood at 101.9 in the third quarter, up 0.1 percent from its second-quarter level. The SSPI is constructed so that the health of the salon/spa industry is measured in relation to a steady state level of 100. Index values above 100 indicate that key industry indicators are in a period of expansion, while index values below 100 represent a period of contraction for key industry indicators.

“For the first time this year, salon/spa owners reported a net increase in service sales. However, they also reported that retail sales continue to be soft,” said Sam Leyvas, PBA’s director of government affairs. “Long term we are seeing growing optimism on the part of salon/spa owners both in terms of service and retail sales in the months ahead.

The SSPI is based on the responses to PBA’s Salon/Spa Industry Tracking Survey, which is fielded quarterly among 800 salon/spa owners nationwide on a variety of indicators including service and retail sales, customer traffic, employee/hours and capital expenditures. The Index consists of two components — the Current Situation Index and the Expectations Index.

The Current Situation Index, which measures current trends in five industry indicators (service sales, retail sales, customer traffic, employees/hours and capital expenditures), stood at 99.1 in the third quarter - down 0.6 percent from its second quarter level of 99.7. The Current Situation Index has remained below 100 throughout 2009, which represents contraction in the current situation indicators.

For the first time in 2009, salon/spa owners reported a net increase in service sales, meaning more owners reported higher sales than lower sales. Thirty-eight percent of salon/spa owners reported an increase in same-store service sales between the third quarters of 2008 and 2009, while 36 percent reported a sales decline.

Although salon/spa owners reported an improvement in service sales in the third quarter, they continued to report soft retail sales. Forty-seven percent of salon/spa owners reported lower retail sales in the third quarter while thirty-six percent of salon/spa owners reported higher retail sales between the third quarters of 2008 and 2009.

The Expectations Index, which measures salon/spa owners’ six-month outlook for five industry indicators (service sales, retail sales, employees, capital expenditures and business conditions), rose 0.7 percent in the third quarter to a level of 104.6. The Expectations Index remains well above 100, which indicates that salon/spa owners are optimistic about industry growth in the months ahead.

Third quarter growth in the Expectations Index was driven by growing optimism for both service and retail sales in the months ahead. Fully seven out of 10 salon/spa owners said they expect to have higher service sales in six months (compared to the same period in the previous year). Only 8 percent of salon/spa owners expect their service sales volume in six months to be lower than it was during the same period in the previous year.

Salon/spa owners are also much more optimistic about stronger retail sales in the months ahead. Sixty-one percent of salon/spa owners said they expect to have higher retail sales in six months (compared to the same period in the previous year. In comparison, just 9 percent expect their retail sales to decline in six months (compared to the same period in the previous year).

“PBA takes pride in providing timely and relevant economic data to the marketplace,” said Sam Leyvas “doing so is critical to our mission as the industry’s leading trade association.”

The full SSPI and second quarter Salon/Spa Tracking Survey Report can be found at www.probeauty.org.

End 2009 in Positive Territory

by Staff on Friday, September 25th, 2009

Nick Arrojo

Nick Arrojo

While the holiday season is usually the busiest time of year in salons, it’s also the best time to build business for the coming year by attracting new clients and prepping your loyal base for 2010. P&G Salon Professional, in its ongoing initiative to help salons conquer the current downturn, offers advice from some of its best-known and most successful salon owner partners.

Gift Certificates: Nick Arrojo at Arrojo Studio in New York City details a program that has been very successful in his salon. “Give the Gift of Great Hair” offers a special makeover for the recipient, including a consultation and haircut, a hair color process, a makeup application and lesson, and four take-home hair products. “Offer something out of the ordinary, like a year’s worth of Sebastian Cellophanes, at a special price—that’s the secret to successful gift cards,” says Arrojo.

Transform Referrals Into Forever Clients: Nick also knows referrals are a critical path to building success. “It’s better to have a lot more clients spending a little less money than to have fewer clients spending the same,” he says. The Arrojo Studio offers a “Rewards for Bringing a Friend” program for current or new clients who bring a friend who has never been to Arrojo Studio before. The deal? Two cuts and/or colors for the price of one!

Andrew Poulos

Andrew Poulos

Andrew Poulos of Diva International in San Francisco gives each new client a gift envelope with special offers for future services. He also advises follow-up calls or e-mails to solidify the salon’s and stylist’s connection with their new client.

“We call each client within 24–48 hours of their first appointment to be sure she feels she’s received the ultimate service,” says Poulos. “This follow-up keeps new clients connected to the salon. With color clients, we also call 5–7 days after the service to see how the new color is working for them.”

Use Social Media to Win: Vidal Sassoon’s Stephen Moody uses social media to keep in touch with clients and encourages them to post reviews on www.yelp.com to build word-of-mouth business. There’s nothing like a posted recommendation from clients who love your salon.

Lock in Loyal Clients - “At Vidal Sassoon, we want to make each client into a ‘perfect’ client, [one] who depends on us for cut, color and retail products,” notes Moody. Build loyalty by using any open periods on your daily schedule, he suggests, to prepare for quality time with each client. Review your appointment book the night before to identify opportunities for incremental service and product sales.

Stephen Moody

Stephen Moody

Arrojo adds, “Our clients can get free bang trims and neck trims between appointments, free consultations, and free ten-minute makeup applications after a cut or color service.” His “Pre-Booking Discount” keeps clients coming back. If another appointment is pre-booked for within five weeks of the day of the client’s service, she receives a 10% discount when she returns.

Prepare Today for 2010: Capitalize on the busy holiday season to attract new clients and firm up your loyal client base for the year ahead. One reliable way of building revenue is to enhance the quality of the salon appointment.

“Elevate the client experience and create a festive feeling in your salon this season,” counsels Poulos. “We offer espresso and popular wines. We stock only name-brand products for retail sale and we explain how to use each product. Make her feel special and she’ll come back.”

Holiday and everyday retail tips: As a leader in salon retailing, the experts at P&G Salon Professional offer these important pointers for boosting year-end sales.

  • Promote gift and impulse purchases by packaging products in go-together sets. Sebastian offers holiday gift-with-purchase pre-packs that can be displayed prominently in the salon.
  • Merchandise promotions separately from regular stock, and place in high-traffic areas.
  • Position impulse items at the reception desk, such as Nioxin travel-sized products.
  • Announce the specifics of your promotion with signage on or near the product display.
  • Display every product a minimum of 3-deep on the shelves. Now is not the time to run out!
  • Keep your display area neat, clean and clutter free. Have junior stylists straighten and re-stock the retail display every evening.
  • Use shelf-talkers and other manufacturer-provided signs within your display to speak directly to the client.

Check www.pgsalonpro.com for more ideas.


The Pros and Cons of Booth Renting

by Lilly Rockwell on Tuesday, September 1st, 2009

It’s a common crossroad for many established hair stylists: do I work for a salon or become a free agent?

It can be a tough decision for many hair stylists used to the guaranteed income, comforts and camaraderie that come with working at a salon as an employee.Those who strike out on their own by renting a chair from a salon instead will find greater responsibilities and, potentially, a bigger payoff.

The trend of booth renting has become one of the most contentious trends in the industry, with many salon owners citing it as the potential downfall of their industry.

“I think it has to go away,” Ron King, owner of Bo Salon in Austin, Texas, says of the trend. “It cheapens the business. They are one reason people don’t respect stylists.”

For those pondering becoming an independent contractor, there are a number of important considerations.

“Once you rent, you have to buy everything,” said Cala Renee, a curly hair specialist who runs her own salon in Beverly, Mass. However, “it’s a great start for somebody who might be interested in opening his or her own salon.”

By renting, stylists pay to use the chair and provide their own equipment. In turn, the stylists get the freedom of setting their own hours and keeping all the money that comes in for each haircut, plus tips.

Working at a salon means the stylist is part of the staff and paid on commission, typically between 45 and 65 percent of the cost of the haircut, plus tips. The salon pays for your equipment, training and provides personnel assistance such as a receptionist. A salon can also direct walk-ins or new clients your way.

Teresa Callen has done both, and recently opened her own boutique salon called Image Art in Menlo Park, Calif. She specializes in curly hair. The best part about working for a salon is “they do all the paperwork, they deal with all the government nightmare stuff and your taxes are incredibly easy to do.”

“It’s a form of hairdressing paradise if you’re a true artist; it’s fun to just show up and do hair,” Callen said. Still, Callen says she prefers renting a chair. Simply put, a stylist can make more money that way. “There is freedom — you can work whenever you want,” Callen said. But with more money comes more responsibility. That means providing your own tools and products.

“It can be a huge amount to take in,” Callen said. “You have to do everything.”

It can also be difficult to find the right salon owner to rent from.

“It’s very rare to find a really good salon owner that rents out independent chairs,” Callen said. “If you can find them, it’s paradise.”

Cristin Armstrong has worked as a hair stylist for seven years and currently works at New York City-based Takamichi Salon where she specializes in curly hair.

Armstrong recently considered renting a chair, and even found a suitable location, but decided working at a salon is a better fit for her.

“With chair rental it is basically a business-within-a-business,” Armstrong said. “The salon I looked at, the rent was really low.” This salon was asking for $65 a day in rent, considered a bargain for New York. Other stylists said rental fees vary from $850 to $2,000 a month depending on the location and size.

For single mothers or hair stylists looking for a more flexible schedule, booth renting can provide more flexibility as you can determine your own hours.

Working at a salon is best for anyone who is new to hairstyling, or anyone who wants to focus on cutting hair instead of juggling schedules and product inventory.

“For anybody starting out, definitely they want to go somewhere where they can make commission and then consider renting when they are more established,” said Tiffany Anderson-Taylor, who works at the St. Petersburg, Fla,–based Essentials the Salon. Working at a salon gives a stylist an automatic client base to draw from, and exposes them to more experienced hair stylists and training opportunities.

“I could easily look at that option (renting a chair) right now because I do have a big client database and I have a full book right now.” But her salon doesn’t offer booth rentals and she is “really happy” working there.

“The only reason why I’m an independent contractor is I’m a single mother of two,” said Callen, the owner of Image Arts Salon. “If I didn’t need to make more money, I’d love to just show up and cut hair. “

Marty Franco, the owner of Baltimore-based Manetamer Salon, said booth rental could be a financial boon for both the salon owner and hairstylist.

“If you are a stylist and you have a very big book, I recommend booth rentals,” Franco said. A hair stylist with a full book can make about $3,000 a week, he said. While you have to purchase your own supplies, much of that is tax deductible because it is a business expense.

But Franco adds that it can also be distracting for the salon owner and doesn’t make for a very cohesive team when hair stylists are working for themselves.

King of Bo, where two out of the 14 stylists are booth renters, is much more outspoken about the effect on salon owners.

“Independent contractors aren’t team players,” he says. “They all want this beautiful salon to work in, but they don’t realize what comes with it. They want all the profit, but they don’t want any of the expenses. They want to do what they want to do and come in when they want to come in. That’s why I got rid of almost all of them at my salon “

Many hair stylists are happier working in a salon even though they might be able to make more working on their own.

Looking for More Curly Clients?

by Staff on Wednesday, August 5th, 2009

We all have experienced the power of customer reviews — we use Consumer Reports for our electronic purchases, Yelp for restaurant recommendations, and Trip Advisor for travel recommendations. So how important are these customer reviews?

hairstylist quote

Customer reviews are highly valued, research shows.

Very important, it seems. Consumer reviews and rating are popping up on an increasing number of web sites, sites on which users treat brands and services like contestants on American Idol. People are very interested in what their peers have to say, whether negative or positive. Over half the people in the U.S. said they trusted their peers or “a person like me” for information about a company, product, or service — more than they trusted expert sources.

So how else can you help fight the economic downturn, increase your customer reviews on CurlStylist’s sister site NaturallyCurly.com and increase your clientele? According to Marketing Sherpa, 58% of surveyed respondents said they strongly prefer sites that have customer reviews. Not only do the reviews increase sales, they also entices other customers not previously willing to try a product or service to actually try it. This phenomena has led to happier clients and more sales.

What do you need to do next?

#1) Tell your favorite curly clients to write a review today. All they need to do is go to the CurlSalons section.
Reviews will generate more business for you in the long term. In fact, we can send you exclusive Mirror Decals and Curl cards for every client to see. Email us today to receive your Curl Ambassador packet.

#2) Another active approach you can take with CurlSalons on NaturallyCurly.com is to sign on to advertise in the monthly state program. To learn more about promoting your salon on NaturallyCurly.com, contact us.

Salon Industry Outlook Improving

by Staff on Tuesday, August 4th, 2009

Phoenix, AZ (August 4, 2009) — The outlook for the salon/spa industry improved in the second quarter, as the Professional Beauty Association’s (PBA) comprehensive index of salon/spa activity registered a solid gain. The Association’s Salon/Spa Performance Index (SSPI) — a new quarterly composite index that tracks the health of and outlook for the U.S. salon/spa industry — stood at 101.8 in the second quarter, up 0.7 percent from its first quarter level.

“The SSPI rose in the second quarter, and stood above 100, which is a positive sign for the overall health of our industry,” said Steve Sleeper, executive director of PBA. “Salon/spa owners reported a positive six-month economic outlook for both sales and the overall economy, while capital spending plans held relatively steady.”

The Salon/Spa Performance Index is based on the responses to PBA’s Salon/Spa Industry Tracking Survey, which is fielded quarterly among salon/spa owners nationwide on a variety of indicators including service and retail sales, customer traffic, employee/hours and capital expenditures. The Index consists of two components — the Current Situation Index and the Expectations Index.

The Salon/Spa Performance Index is constructed so that the health of the salon/spa industry is measured in relation to a steady-state level of 100. Index values above 100 indicate that key industry indicators are in a period of expansion, while index values below 100 represent a period of contraction for key industry indicators.

The Current Situation Index, which measures current trends in five industry indicators (service sales, retail sales, customer traffic, employees/hours and capital expenditures), stood at 99.7 in the second quarter - up 0.9 percent from its first quarter level of 98.8. However, the Current Situation Index remained below 100 in the second quarter, which signifies contraction in the current situation indicators.

Salon/spa owners reported an improvement in service sales in the second quarter. Thirty-nine percent of salon/spa owners reported an increase in same-store service sales between the second quarters of 2008 and 2009, up from 35 percent who reported a sales gain in the first quarter. Thirty-nine percent of salon/spa owners reported a same-store service sales decline in the second quarter, down from 44 who reported lower sales in the first quarter.

Although the overall retail sales picture improved somewhat in the second quarter, salon/spa owners continued to report lower retail sales volume. Thirty-three percent of salon/spa owners reported higher retail sales between the second quarters of 2008 and 2009, up from 26 percent who reported a retail sales gain in the first quarter. Forty-four percent of salon/spa owners reported lower retail sales in the second quarter, down from 49 percent who reported similarly in the first quarter.

Salon/spa owners reported a solid improvement in customer traffic levels in the second quarter. Thirty-eight percent of salon/spa owners reported an increase in customer traffic between the second quarters of 2008 and 2009, while only 31 percent said their customer traffic levels declined. In the first quarter, 33 percent of salon/spa owners reported an increase in customer traffic, while 40 percent reported traffic declines.

Labor indicators were a mixed bag in the second quarter, with salon/spa owners reporting slightly higher staffing levels but a decline in employee hours. Twenty-eight percent of salon/spa owners said they added employees between the second quarters of 2008 and 2009, while 23 percent said they reduced staffing levels.

In contrast, 24 percent of salon/spa owners said they cut employee hours between the second quarters of 2008 and 2009, while only 15 percent increased employee hours.

The Expectations Index, which measures salon/spa owners’ six-month outlook for five industry indicators (service sales, retail sales, employees/hours, capital expenditures and business conditions), stood at 103.9 in the second quarter - up 0.6 percent from its first quarter level. In addition, the Expectations Index stood well above 100, which indicates a solid level of optimism among salon/spa owners for industry growth in the months ahead.

Growth in the Expectations Index was driven by an increasingly optimistic outlook for sales growth in the months ahead. Sixty percent of salon/spa owners said they expect to have higher service sales in six months (compared to the same period in the previous year), up from 54 percent who reported similarly last quarter. Only 13 percent of salon/spa owners expect their service sales volume in six months to be lower than it was during the same period in the previous year, down slightly from 15 percent who reported similarly last quarter.

A majority of salon/spa owners also expect to see retail sales growth in the months ahead. Fifty-one percent of salon/spa owners said they expect to have higher retail sales in six months (compared to the same period in the previous year), up from 46 percent who reported similarly last quarter. In comparison, 15 percent expect their retail sales to decline in six months (compared to the same period in the previous year), down from 22 percent who reported similarly last quarter.

Salon/spa owners are also decidedly upbeat about the direction of the overall economy. Sixty-three percent of salon/spa owners said they expect economic conditions to improve in six months, while only six percent expect to see worse economic conditions in six months. This sentiment was relatively unchanged from first quarter levels.

“The Professional Beauty Association continues to supply the beauty industry with timely and relevant economic data to help our members and the industry at large make successful and strategic business decisions” said Steve Sleeper “doing so is a core mission of the PBA.”

The full SSPI and second quarter Salon/Spa Tracking Survey Report can be found at www.probeauty.org.

Entries (RSS) and Comments (RSS)

search