Posts Tagged ‘ron king’

Ron King: Braids Are Hot in 2011

by The Style King/Ron King on Monday, December 20th, 2010

ron king

Ron King has worked as a hairstylist, transforming people’s appearances, for more than 20 years. With a growing celebrity clientele, King travels the world taking inspiration from different cultures and countries. Along the way, he has developed his own “easy wear” style philosophy which plays up a woman’s natural hair texture and pairs it with natural-looking makeup that’s easy to apply. This mantra led him to launch a signature line of cosmetics for women who want to look pulled together but who are are short on time. King has worked with some of the most respected names in the industry, including L’Oreal Professional, Ted Gibson, Eva Scrivo and Rick Wellman.

Plaited locks are making the rounds again, this time in a spin on fun, ’60s-style hairtstyles. Gwen Stefani wore a very “braid-y” look to a recent 2011 runway show and received a lot of press for it. The scene-stealing style in question was an almost lionesque mane of swooped back braids and knots that culminated in a high, messy chic bun in the back. Woven into her strands were colorful peices of string, which added her signature funk to the ‘do. I recommend using a lot of product to get this look and to rough it up a bit to get that great texture Gwen has. Finish off the look with very polished makeup, as Gwen did, so the messy hair looks intentional and stylish instead of just plain crazy sloppy (and maybe save the bright stands for a special occasion).

Braided Models

Photo from Ron King’s blog.

The models at the LAMB fashion show for spring/summer 2011 were similarly styled with a multi-ethnic braided style that has the same coquettish appeal, thanks to the style’s masculine/femme dichotomy (part pompadour and/or clipped back in front with a braided pony). Hairdresser Danilo also used L’Oreal Professional products to achieve the braided ponytail look. To get a subtler take on Gwen’s colorful strands, he incorporated one of my fave products, Inoa color, to give highlights and dimension to the hair.

The hairstyles at the Joanna Mastroianni Spring 2011 show were also fun and were styled by yours truly! I wanted to do a futuristic spin on a retro style, namely the perky high ponytail of the mod era, but brought it up to date by adding height and texture and loosely braiding the tail. It was a flirty look that was created by flat ironing the hair and then pulling it into a high ponytail, which was braided loosely. It was then twisted into a figure eight and then pinned under. I used L’Oréal Professionnel Texture Expert Lumi Controle and #2 hairspray. A similarly vintage-inspired face was shown at the show as well. This style is a bit more tame than Gwen’s, but still captures the retro slash modern braided look, and therefore is great for the more conservatively trendy. Pair it with sleekly stylish clothes like Mastroianni’s and you’re all set for the coming seasons.

Ron King Foundation Awards Major Cosmetology Scholarship

by Megan Dorcey on Wednesday, December 15th, 2010

Ron King

We were honored to be invited to the Ron King Salon Grand Opening on Sunday night at the Four Seasons Hotel in Austin, TX. The Style King wanted to share his success with the entire city by throwing a major soiree and runway show with NY designer, Thuy. To open the show, INOA by L’Oreal Paris had four models including their signature fiery red head, with insane texture and vibrant colors.








Model

The famous INOA red hair.

The one reason we were all there was to honor The Ron King Foundation’s scholarship winner, Briana Flores. King’s Foundation has a goal to directly influence young cosmetology students. Not only did he hand over $25,000 in scholarship funds, but he also promised to mentor the student throughout their career.









Scholarship Awardee

Ron King with Briana Flores, accepting the scholarship.

The entire event went off without a hitch, and we can’t wait to see what this super-stylist has up his sleeve for the future. We wish all the best of luck to the new Ron King Salon in the Four Seasons Hotel in Austin.

Layered Cuts: Yes or No?

by The Style King/Ron King on Monday, December 6th, 2010

ron king

Ron King has worked as a hairstylist, transforming people’s appearances, for more than 20 years. With a growing celebrity clientele, King travels the world taking inspiration from different cultures and countries. Along the way, he has developed his own “easy wear” style philosophy which plays up a woman’s natural hair texture and pairs it with natural-looking makeup that’s easy to apply. This mantra led him to launch a signature line of cosmetics for women who want to look pulled together but who are are short on time. King has worked with some of the most respected names in the industry, including L’Oreal Professional, Ted Gibson, Eva Scrivo and Rick Wellman.

Layering hair can be a beautiful thing. Not only are layers stylish and versatile, but they also add body and volume to blah hairstyles… But not everyone is cut out for wearing layered locks. It takes a very specific hair type and personality to pull it off and some people might be better suited to wearing a blunt cut. Not sure whether to layer on certain clients?

Take into stock individual hair texture, thickness and density first. Most manes can be classified as straight, wavy and curly with some variation. Thickness obviously refers to the width of each individual strand of hair, while density covers how much hair is actually on your head. The two don’t always correlate… A person can have thin hair but a lot of it, for example.

As a general rule, follow these guidelines. Curly hair should never be cut blunt. This will create the dreaded pyramid cut, with lots of fluff and volume at the bottom. Instead, cut well-blended, gradual layers so the effect is not so harsh. It’s also better to keep curly locks shoulder length and shorter, particularly with thin or sparse hair (so it doesn’t appear stringy) and because it’s more up to date. This will also give more options if the client wants looser curls or to style hair straight.

Wavy hair looks nice with layers as well, but does not need an as intense of a layering technique. A few long, face-framing layers in front should do the trick for fine or medium-thick hair or a not-so-dense mane. Have thicker, wavy hair? Try a similar effect but have your stylist cut longer, face framing layers all around the head.

Lastly, straight hair is the hair type that looks best in blunt, or all one length hairstyles. In fact, fine, straight is ideal for a sharp and mod bob with clean lines. This will beef up the texture instead of cutting into it. For straight and thick hair, a one-length style will work but make sure to keep the mane on the longer side so it gets weighed down and some of the volume gets flattened out. For hair with a slight wave, play up that texture; layers might be a good option as long as hair is not too thin.

Also, take stock of how much time the client is willing to put into their style. If they’re going for an edgy, rocker look with layers, make sure they have the time and desire to keep it looking good and that it matches their overall style.

Ron King: The Case for Commission

by The Style King/Ron King on Monday, June 28th, 2010

ron king

Ron King has worked as a hairstylist, transforming people’s appearances, for more than 20 years. With a growing celebrity clientele, King travels the world taking inspiration from different cultures and countries. Along the way, he has developed his own “easy wear” style philosophy which plays up a woman’s natural hair texture and pairs it with natural-looking makeup that’s easy to apply. This mantra led him to launch a signature line of cosmetics for women who want to look pulled together but who are are short on time. King has worked with some of the most respected names in the industry, including L’Oreal Professional, Ted Gibson, Eva Scrivo and Rick Wellman.

Let’s face it; in our industry the only constant is change. And stylists are used to adjusting to new trends, products, coloring and cutting techniques, clients, and the list goes on. But when it comes to working on commission and leaving their independent contractor days behind, most stylists resist this change.

Now don’t get me wrong, as an entrepreneur I understand the appeal of working independently. I also worked as an independent contractor and employ several at bo Salon, my first location.

However, as a salon owner, I learned how fulfilling it can be to be part of a team of stylists. So as I prepare to open my second salon, Ron King Salon in the Four Seasons Austin, Texas, and interview possible new employees, I’ve found myself explaining the benefits of working for a larger company as opposed to working as an independent contractor. So, I’d like to share them with you as well.

1. Teamwork

When stylists are working for themselves, they are only interested in making more money for themselves. There certainly is no sense of helping each other out, and everyone is disconnected from each other. As a salon owner, this is not good and it’s not good as a stylist either. Learning from each other, working together and helping each other out only makes stylists stronger. Independent contractors are disconnected from this sense of community.

2. Education

Independent contractors are responsible for providing their own education, which takes initiative and discipline. It also is money out of their pocket. Once they realize all that goes into education, it’s been my experience that independent contractors let this fall to the wayside—and we all know how dangerous it is as stylists to fall behind on education. When time is already set aside for education, by an employer, the stylist is much more likely to take the classes.

3. Marketing & Finance

Other responsibilities that fall on independent contractors are managing their finances by paying their taxes on time, marketing themselves for new clients and providing themselves with healthcare. Working for a salon on commission can provide stylists with all of this, which is a major part of making it as a successful stylist.

Ron King: The Green Salon

by The Style King/Ron King on Monday, April 19th, 2010

ron king

Ron King has worked as a hairstylist, transforming people’s appearances, for more than 20 years. With a growing celebrity clientele, King travels the world taking inspiration from different cultures and countries. Along the way, he has developed his own “easy wear” style philosophy which plays up a woman’s natural hair texture and pairs it with natural-looking makeup that’s easy to apply. This mantra led him to launch a signature line of cosmetics for women who want to look pulled together but who are are short on time. King has worked with some of the most respected names in the industry, including L’Oreal Professional, Ted Gibson, Eva Scrivo and Rick Wellman.

Though sustainable living has seemed to be the trendy buzzword among the style and beauty crowds for the past few years, it seems our industry has really taken to it and made some great strides in going green. Since it’s April, and Arbor Day is around the corner, I thought I’d share with you some of the most innovative and eco-friendly professional products I’ve been using lately.

Read more about INOA

By now, I’m sure you’ve heard of L’Oreal Professionnel’s new breakthrough color line called INOA. Short for “innovation, no ammonia,” INOA has managed to make permanent hair color a little greener by taking ammonia, one of the harshest chemicals we work with on a daily basis, out. Instead, they developed a new technology called ODS (oil delivery system) that coats hair with a layer of oil while coloring it to maximize the effectiveness of the formula without ammonia. One added bonus for us as stylists and colorists is that INOA has also eliminated nasty odors. If you haven’t tried INOA yet, test it out—your clients will love it.

Another eco-friendly beauty breakthrough I’m starting to use in my salon is called Bio-Lights. Created by my friend and New York-based celeb stylist Rick Wellman, this system is a green alternative to traditional foil highlights. He recognized the negative effects aluminum has on the environment (aluminum is one of the top materials filling up landfills and can take up to 500 years to decompose. Foil also produces emissions of carbon dioxide contributing to the negative effect of global warming) and also wanted a softer approach to highlighting. Enter Bio-Lights, a highlighting system that trades in foils for 100% biodegradable cotton pads that mimic the shape of foil. And since the cotton pads react in a non-accelerated temperature, Bio-Lights also reduce the risk of baking any color brand into hair.

We all know that formaldehyde in beauty products has a bad rep. Some countries, like England, have even banned the use of the ingredient in treatments and have forced companies to be innovative and go a little greener. La Brasiliana, makers of fabulous keratin treatments infused with collagen, offers a new formaldehyde-free treatment called Spuzzi Zero. This treatment combines their original keratin and collagen formulation with lavender oil and aloe vera. It’s also a great money-making service because Spuzzi Zero is sprayed on to hair so the actual salon process takes much less time. Typical treatments last just over two months, comparable to traditional keratin treatments, but luckily the company makes shampoo, conditioner and styling products to help extend the life of a treatment.

Read more about keratin treatments

Now, this last beauty product isn’t reserved just for beauty professionals; clients can get in on the action also: mineral makeup. Typically in powder formation, it’s very often comprised of finely ground natural ingredients, without any chemicals, dyes, and preservatives, that are considered to be less irritating and healthier for skin than traditional makeup. They also contain a higher level of SPF and aid in achieving that light, sparkling glow that is usually not obtained with heavier skin makeup. This is exactly why I wanted to make my very own makeup collection—Ron King Cosmetics—a mineral line. I love that it’s a green choice in that the byproducts of chemicals used in making traditional makeup are simply not an issue since it is usually void of harmful man-made ingredients. The products are ethical choices that are as kind to your skin as they are to the earth. Most of them have SPF 20 and contain traces of vitamins A, C, and E along with Gingko Biloba and Ginseng for a naturally beautiful look, providing antioxidants and nutrients to your skin. They also have light-diffusing pigments that help fade facial lines (and what woman doesn’t want that?).

I hope this post inspires you to go a little greener at your salon. If you have any other green tips, leave them as comments here—I’d love to hear them!

L’Oreal Introduces Revolutionary New Hair Coloring System

by Gretchen Heber on Friday, April 2nd, 2010

Austin stylist and L’Oreal spokesman Ron King will soon open a second salon in Austin. This is a rendering of the INOA station in his new salon, which will be called Ron King.

More than a century ago, L’Oréal Professionnel introduced the first safe hair dye, “Auréale,” created from mineral salts, to the industry. This month, the company debuts INOA, a revolutionary new ammonia-free permanent hair color.

The color contains an odorless alkaline agent called MEA (monoethanolamine) that replaces ammonia, which opens the hair cuticle slightly to allow for colorants and oxidants to penetrate the cortex to start the coloring process. “It’s more conditioning for the hair and scalp,” says Ron King, L’Oreal spokesperson and owner of Bo Salon in Austin, Texas. “It’s like a treatment for the hair,” he says.

INOA—which stands for “innovation”—works with the ODS technology (Oil Delivery System): an oil base that increases the active potential of the haircolor system while preserving the hair’s natural protective layer twice as much as traditional ammonia-based permanent hair color.

“This is going to stand the color world on end,” says King. “There’s nothing else like it.”

Other color lines have been ammonia-free, says King, but they were semi- or demi-permanent color. “INOA is permanent hair color,” he says. “You get the shine and gloss of a demi but the permanence of a permanent color.”

When using INOA, the stylist and client will choose the color together at a special “bar” area in the salon. “It’s no longer ‘The Wizard of Oz’ scenario, where the stylist disappears behind a curtain to mix up the potion,” says King. It’s a collaborative process, he says. “You interact to choose the color.”

The cost to the customer for INOA is about $50 to $75 more than a regular color service, says King. “But clients are OK with this because they’re getting shine and conditioning. Also, the color doesn’t fade as fast because of the oil delivery system,” so clients can go a bit longer between services, he says.

King’s Bo Salon was one of the first salons in the nation to get the new coloring system; he’s been using it on customers since September. Clients, he says, “feel more comfortable coming into the salon and having their hair colored because the color is completely balanced. They love the way it feels on the scalp. They feel like it’s holding the color better than it ever had.”

L’Oreal Launches INOA at ABS

by Blog from America's Beauty Show on Wednesday, March 31st, 2010

loreal inoa
loreal inoa


One of the splashiest stages at ABS was L’Oreal’s. The company launched its new INOA color system with a bevy of models wearing spectacularly decorous headwear, including flowers, feathers and butterflies. The sizable crowd gathered around the stage gawked at the beautiful, colorful display.

INOA is a revolutionary new ammonia-free permanent hair color, which contains an odorless alkaline agent called MEA (monoethanolamine) that replaces ammonia. “It’s more conditioning for the hair and scalp,” says Ron King, L’Oreal spokesperson and owner of Bo Salon in Austin, Texas. “It’s like a treatment for the hair,” he says.

Click here for more information about INOA.

The Style King: Four Motivators

by The Style King/Ron King on Monday, February 8th, 2010

ron king

Ron King has worked as a hairstylist, transforming people’s appearances, for more than 20 years. With a growing celebrity clientele, King travels the world taking inspiration from different cultures and countries. Along the way, he has developed his own “easy wear” style philosophy which plays up a woman’s natural hair texture and pairs it with natural-looking makeup that’s easy to apply. This mantra led him to launch a signature line of cosmetics for women who want to look pulled together but who are are short on time. King has worked with some of the most respected names in the industry, including L’Oreal Professional, Ted Gibson, Eva Scrivo and Rick Wellman.

As a stylist, I know that it’s easy to feel uninspired and fall into a rut. The day-in and day-out of salon life makes it easy for us to lack imagination, and (horror of all horrors) our clients may start to look the same. But I also know that creativity and passion are the names of the game and the most important part of retaining clients. So over the years I’ve found some ways to keep myself motivated.

Since it’s still the beginning of a new year, I thought I’d share them with you to either try yourself or inspire you to find your own tricks for keeping it fresh and current behind the chair.

Education

First and foremost, learning new cutting or coloring techniques is a sure way to switch it up! Forget the same old foil highlights and sign up for a class that teaches you how to balayage, for example. This will definitely challenge you and give you an opportunity to expand your business. Plus, clients love newness! When they come back and you always have a new technique or product to share with them, they’ll start to look at you as their style authority. Make it a goal to enroll in one class per month – even if your salon doesn’t offer any, take initiative and sign up by yourself or with a coworker.

Travel

I travel regularly to new cities. One thing I’ve noticed is that each place has a style of its own, and I love seeing all the different looks and replicating them on my clients when I come home. Now, I understand that not everyone has the opportunity to travel, so, instead, check out a new part of town and see what kind of hair everyone’s rocking. If you work in a suburb, spend a day in a trendy part of the city and look for new style ideas. You’ll be pleasantly surprised what’s out there, probably even in your own backyard.

Events

Nothing will get your creative juices flowing more than participating in events. Doing hair for a local high school fashion show or for a charitable cut-a-thon will introduce you to new people and offer you a rare chance to collaborate with creative people who push you to try new looks.

Charity

This is so important to me and something that I require from my staff. We regularly volunteer by teaching classes at a local cosmetology school. The excitement from the students is priceless and rubs off on us, extending to our work. I highly recommend volunteering and sharing your knowledge, the pay back is tenfold.

I know these things work for me, I hope they help you too! For more ideas, style tips and new product reviews, check out my blog thestyleking.net.

Communication is Key

by CurlStylist on Tuesday, December 8th, 2009

Ron King

Ron King

“You can be super skilled but if you don’t communicate with your clients, your skills are useless.”

— Ron King, owner of Bo Salon in Austin, Texas

Students Treated to Priceless Info from Austin Curl Expert

by Aileen Passariello on Friday, August 14th, 2009

ron king

Ron King offers drying tips to a class at Avenue Five.

CurlStylist recently hosted a curly education class for the students at Avenue Five, a cosmetology school in Austin. Curl expert Ron King, owner and head stylist at Bo Salon, was the day’s educator.

King, who says his clients “just can’t stay away,” began the class by explaining that the most important key to success is customer service. Ron attributes his success to the relationship he builds with each client, the trust he develops, and most importantly the customer service that all clients receive every time they enter his salon. Staying consistent with their experience and cut is what makes customers loyal, he says. King emphasized the importance of “contact” by touching the hair, touching the customer’s shoulders, listening, and understanding to gain that trust needed for developing that strong bond between a hair stylist and their customer.

Also, he advises, stylists should not assume that they know what their clients want before they sit down in the chair. “Don’t just assume you know what your client wants because they will surprise you. Always sit down with them, listen to them, discuss how they are feeling and then give your opinion. Clients feel different each day and maybe that day, they are looking for something different. It is important to always listen.”

The students thoroughly enjoyed the class, taking away a wealth of useful information for their future careers.

“Today’s class was very informative and inspiring. I learned how to think about textured hair in a totally new way,” says student Hilary Lowry, who is known on ChairTalk as hil214.

King learned to cut curly hair with Deva. He attended a class in New York and has perfected his technique over the years.

He says he always cuts curly hair dry and always starts from the inside, using a bricklayer pattern. When separating the hair, try to avoid disruption of the curl, he suggests; don’t rip or tear. When cutting, always cut in the bend of the curl to enhance the spring action and create lift.

“Cutting curly hair from the inside in a bricklayer pattern made total sense, and trying not to disrupt the curl as much as possible makes a huge difference in the outcome,” says Lowry.

King addresses the important difference between cutting curly hair and straight hair. “No two curls are the same,” he says. Therefore, each strand has to be treated as an individual, he reminded the class.

“Pick up the curl, shake it out, and cut down the curl,” he emphasizes. Ron believes that the optimal shape for curly girls is the oval shape, as this shape avoids the “bozo the clown look or the mullet look.”

King told the class that after cutting, it is important to condition your client’s hair. Curly hair tends to be dry, so King recommends that his clients cleanse (not shampoo) their hair once a week. Once the washing and the massaging of the scalp is complete, King uses paper towels to absorb excess water. Regular towels have too many fibers and break the curls, he counsels. Fun tip: Sham wow towels also work great! King recommends using fingers to detangle the hair (or a wide-toothed comb) and then with a mixture of product on a paper towel, he mixes Deva B’Leave-in Conditioner and AnGel.

King uses a diffuser on his clients in the salon, but he recommends his clients air dry their hair as much as possible to avoid too much heat. Ron uses as many as 15 duckbill clips on top of the head to achieve root lift. He also recommends the students always diffuse from the bottom of the hair — not the top. King recommends setting your dryer on low speed and high heat setting. He suggests spraying the hair with Deva Set Me Up! pomade. The heat activates the pomade and gives the curl a shinny look.

Lowry was thrilled with all the real-world information King imparted. “I was also eager to learn how much online reviews and networking in the right ways can help your career,” she said.

And ChairTalker AndieJ22 added, “By far it was one of the best classes I’ve seen here. I graduate on Thursday and I couldn’t be more excited and I hope to learn more from Ron in the future.”

Top 10 Tips from Ron King

1. Stylists need to embrace curls and get over their fears before they can cut curly hair
2. Make contact — gain trust by listening and understanding your customer
3. Stay loyal to one product line — keep it simple for your customers
4. It is very important to educate your client about taking care of her hair
5. The majority of your clients are not looking for a shock effect
6. Be consistent with customer experience
7. Don’t get too comfortable with customers; they will surprise you
8. No one curl is like another
9. The best look for a curly hair is an oval shape
10. Cut in the bend of the curl

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