Posts Tagged ‘ivan zoot’

Curly Cutting Deva Style

by Ivan Zoot/The Clipper Guy on Wednesday, March 2nd, 2011

ivan zoot

Ivan Zoot is the director of education and customer engagement for the Andis Company and the founder of Zoot! Hair professional hair care products. Ivan identifies, recruits, trains and manages Andis’s team of professional beauty industry educators. Ivan continues to be a featured presenter at industry shows and events, sharing his unique blend of information, education and enthusiasm for clipper cutting and the entire professional beauty industry. Ivan’s background includes experiences ranging from salon ownership to achieving 3 Guinness World Haircutting records. Here, he shares his cutting and business-building expertise.

I was a guest at a recent Deva Concepts Curlaboration program and participated in their curly hair cutting program. I learned a lot about the world of curly hair and specifically their take on how to cut it. Following are my top five reflections from that curly cutting experience.

1. Respect length: It is not that curly hair grows more slowly, it is that it takes a lot longer to show that length as the hair coils. To that end, every millimeter and month of growth is that much more precious. Go easy. Trim small. Respect the length that is so important to the curly client.

2. Cut dry: They wear it dry. It curls dry. Examine it dry and cut it dry to truly assess the behavior of the curl. Curls can vary throughout the head and once it is wet, all this information is lost.

3. Keep it simple: The kinds of hair cuts that would not make a bit of difference for straight-haired clients make a world of difference for the curly ones. Think simple. Clean up ends and define perimeter shapes. Remove some interior weight and open up face areas. Do not think in terms of complicated structural shapes. Think more maintenance and less creation.

4. Length and width: Focus on these two dimensions. How much length does the client wish to keep? Notice I did not say, “How much length do we want to remove?” How much weight must we retain to prevent the look from expanding sideways? We can alter length and width, but we want to do so slowly and carefully.

5. Make it an experience: Every element of the salon experience must be made special and memorable. Curly clients visit less often and so each visit must have that much more impact to sustain our relationship with them. Appealing to all five senses in powerful ways creates experiences that justify our prices and enhance the experience in the eyes of our clients.

Curly hair cutting can be a huge profit center in and of itself. Other companies beyond Deva offer curl specific systems and training but Deva has really separated themselves as the segment leader. In future posts, I will share more of what I am learning in the curly world. I welcome your thoughts, comments and experiences. Please comment and post below.

R you Ready for 2011?

by Ivan Zoot/The Clipper Guy on Thursday, February 3rd, 2011

ivan zoot

Ivan Zoot is the director of education and customer engagement for the Andis Company and the founder of Zoot! Hair professional hair care products. Ivan identifies, recruits, trains and manages Andis’s team of professional beauty industry educators. Ivan continues to be a featured presenter at industry shows and events, sharing his unique blend of information, education and enthusiasm for clipper cutting and the entire professional beauty industry. Ivan’s background includes experiences ranging from salon ownership to achieving 3 Guinness World Haircutting records. Here, he shares his cutting and business-building expertise.

2011 is here. R you ready for a great salon year? R you ready to provide your clients with the amazing curls they crave and will pay handsomely to enjoy?

Here R my top five Rs for a successful 2011 behind the chair.

R is for Repeat. There are a lot of curly heads out there. Even still we cannot afford to cut them all at once. The foundation of our business still rests on positive client experiences that result in repeat customers. Listen, serve and take good care of people. The modern golden rule: Treat others as THEY would wish to be treated. Stick to it and watch profits soar.

R is for Referral. Happy customers send their friends. It is an industry basic. It is FREE. The big piece of the puzzle is the asking. Do not just expect them to send their friends. You must ask, beg, plead and cajole your clients to send their friends. A little compensation can go a long way, too. A referral bounty, free product samples, bucks off on a cut—there are lots of ways to play it.

R is for Retailing. Use and recommend take-home hair care product. That is the best way to move it from your salon shelf to their bathroom cabinet. Notice: I did not say “sell” product. No one wants to be sold. Everyone loves to buy. Make it easy and fun to buy and clients will clear you out. R is also for reorder!

R is for Rebooking. Ring them up (another R) and then rebook them. Getting the client’s next appointment on the book before they leave the salon is the number one non-technical skill you can develop to ensure salon success. You pick the visit interval. Offer the appointment. Most satisfied clients will jump at the rebook offer. If you get a lot of decliners it is time to look closer at client satisfaction levels. R they really happy? Really, really happy? How do you know? Have you asked recently?

R is for Reading. Reading is the foundation of education. Read books. Read blogs (you R). Look at the pictures and use reading as the launching point of your efforts to educate yourself in 2011. Education is the key to raising the bar on your skills, your service and your success in hair and beauty. This year I will be sharing books I am reading that I think you might enjoy. Start with “What Women Want” by Paco Underhill. Women make up a huge part of our industry. Understand what they seek and deliver it. They will deliver loyalty and profits.

I hope you have a great 2011. I know I R going to ☺.

Top 5 Tips for Suggesting Change

by Ivan Zoot/The Clipper Guy on Monday, November 8th, 2010

ivan zoot

Ivan Zoot is the director of education and customer engagement for the Andis Company and the founder of Zoot! Hair professional hair care products. Ivan identifies, recruits, trains and manages Andis’ team of professional beauty industry educators. Ivan continues to be a featured presenter at industry shows and events, sharing his unique blend of information, education and enthusiasm for clipper cutting and the entire professional beauty industry. Ivan’s background includes experiences ranging from salon ownership to achieving 3 Guinness World Haircutting records.

Some clients just aren’t ready to see big pieces of hair hit the floor. We must respect this to retain them as clients. We need to continue to suggest updates and modifications to their look. We have a responsibility to them keep them looking current. We have a responsibility to ourselves to keep from being bored to tears, too.

Selling subtle changes requires us to draw from an arsenal of sales skills. Here are my top five tips for selling small changes.

1. Measure accurately and respectfully: An inch should be an inch. A comb with demarcations is a great tool for clarifying what is to be cut. Stay true to the agreed upon change.

2. Focus on the hair that they are keeping: The hair that hits the floor is not important. The client should be steered to discuss the hair that will remain on their head. This is the hair that they will take home. This is the hair they are wearing.

3. Offer a change they can not easily see: Change the back of their hair cut. Take the interior layers a bit shorter. Remove more internal weight from a shape to collapse it a bit. These are examples of subtle changes that can make a difference in the cut and the look but are not as readily apparent to the client.

4. Repeat a change from their past: Keep the client in their comfort zone by revolving a client back to a prior look. You sold it once. It should be just a bit easier to sell the same change to the same client again. You have been down this road before.

5. Maintain perspective: You may change people’s hair every day, even every hour. They will only have one haircut this month. We can lose sight of how even subtle changes can feel big and scary for the client. Know when to push. Know when to knock out that look that you can do in your sleep.

Please share recent success you have enjoyed in changing a long-time client who was stuck in a look rut. Some of the small changes will be the ones for which we can be most proud.

Happy changing.

Top 5 Tips for Clippering Short Using the 2-for-1 Blade Cutting Concept

by Ivan Zoot/The Clipper Guy on Monday, October 11th, 2010

ivan zoot

Ivan Zoot is the director of education and customer engagement for the Andis Company and the founder of Zoot! Hair professional hair care products. Ivan identifies, recruits, trains and manages Andis’ team of professional beauty industry educators. Ivan continues to be a featured presenter at industry shows and events, sharing his unique blend of information, education and enthusiasm for clipper cutting and the entire professional beauty industry. Ivan’s background includes experiences ranging from salon ownership to achieving 3 Guinness World Haircutting records.

I have mentioned that some of us have forgotten a lot about haircutting. It is not that we have forgotten it. It is that we have known it and lived it for so long that we no longer think about it. It is just a fact for us. We use our hands with these ideas ingrained in our heads. We do not need to consciously think about these things. When training a newbie, we might never remember to reference some of these important points.

When cutting short curly hair with a clipper, one of the most important points to remember is that any one blade can deliver two distinctly different cutting lengths.

Here are my top 5 tips related to this 2-for-1 blade cutting concept.

1. Cutting with the grain: Cutting with the grain (growth direction) lays the hair down in the path of the clipper blade. This produces a distinctly longer length than the opposite.

2.Cutting against the grain: Cutting against the grain lifts the hair with the leading edge of the non-moving blade. This lift-and-cut action results in a shorter remaining length on the head.

3. Tipping the blade out / cutting with the corner: The ramped underside of the non-moving clipper blade provides another multiple length cutting opportunity. Levering the blade so only a portion of the toothed cutting edge makes scalp contact is a great blending technique.

4. Cutting with guide combs: Points 1 and 2 above are not limited to the use or detachable blades. The principle holds when cutting with plastic snap-on guide combs.

5. Using this concept to do better, faster fading: The rubber meets the road, or the hair leaves the head, so to speak, when this powerful knowledge is applied to cutting tight faded clipper cuts on textured hair. Cut from the top down with longer blades first. Initially with the grain and then lower down the head with the same blade in a reversed direction. Bingo! Fast and smooth, lineless fading.

Tell us how you use these 2-for-1 length facts to cut hair every day whether you think about it or not.

Happy cutting.

Share your stories

by Ivan Zoot/The Clipper Guy on Monday, September 27th, 2010

ivan zoot

Ivan Zoot is the director of education and customer engagement for the Andis Company and the founder of Zoot! Hair professional hair care products. Ivan identifies, recruits, trains and manages Andis’ team of professional beauty industry educators. Ivan continues to be a featured presenter at industry shows and events, sharing his unique blend of information, education and enthusiasm for clipper cutting and the entire professional beauty industry. Ivan’s background includes experiences ranging from salon ownership to achieving 3 Guinness World Haircutting records.

How many times have you said, “I could write a book” after a particular client experience?

How many of us ever write that book? I did. I wrote six of them, but, that is a story for another day.

Today I want to ask you to share your stories here. We all have plenty of stories in our haircutting past. Since we do not have the time to write a book, small postings are something we find easier to do. Here are my top five categories of hair cutting stories. Please use the comment function here to share one of your favorite stories from these categories or your own. I will highlight some of them in future postings. The next posting from me will be me sharing one of mine.

1. OOPS stories: Sometimes things go wrong. Sometimes things go REALLY wrong. How bad was it? How did you fix it?

2. A ha! Stories: Sometimes we learn things. Sometimes we are surprised to learn some things. Some times we learn the hard way. What have you learned?

3. Crazy client stories: We all have them, both the crazy clients and the stories. Often truth is stranger than fiction.

4. Personal hair experiences: Usually we are the stylist. Sometimes we are the client. What is that expression, “stuff happens”? Tell us what happened.

5. Warm and fuzzy stories: Hair cutting is filled with opportunities to positively impact the lives of others in powerful, meaningful ways. You have a lot of these stories. Sharing them makes you and us feel great.

Change the names to protect the innocent or the guilty as needed. We look forward to hearing form you.

Happy haircutting.

Ivan

My Stories – Early hair cutting lessons learned

by Ivan Zoot/The Clipper Guy on Monday, September 13th, 2010

ivan zoot

Ivan Zoot is the director of education and customer engagement for the Andis Company and the founder of Zoot! Hair professional hair care products. Ivan identifies, recruits, trains and manages Andis’ team of professional beauty industry educators. Ivan continues to be a featured presenter at industry shows and events, sharing his unique blend of information, education and enthusiasm for clipper cutting and the entire professional beauty industry. Ivan’s background includes experiences ranging from salon ownership to achieving 3 Guinness World Haircutting records.

I have asked you to share your stories. I will start off with one of mine.

I had been in hair school for just a short time. I had been begging my wife to let me cut her hair. Finally, she agreed. She figured she would not be able to say no forever. After all, we were married.

No one told me hair stretches when it is wet. No one told one fine hair stretches a LOT. My wife has a large forehead. My wife has always worn bangs. My wife is rather particular about her bangs. My wife likes her bangs right at her eyebrows.

I was determined to cut her bangs perfectly. She would trust me after that and let me try all kinds of services. I grabbed her bangs. I pulled them tight. I held them right at the eyebrow. I carefully cut them to the EXACT length of her brows. Wow! Hair stretches when it is wet. Fine hair stretches a LOT! Those bangs shrunk up to stubby little sprigs barely halfway down her forehead.

Here are my top 5 lessons learned form this experience.

1. Hair stretches when it is wet.

2. Fine hair stretches a LOT.

3. Just because you have been in cosmetology school for 3 weeks does not mean you know much.

4. There is always more to learn. Some of it has long ago been forgotten by teachers and veterans. They might leave out a few things out… and not on purpose.

5. My wife loves me a lot.

Tell us what you learned and how you learned it. And while you are at it please remind us of a few things we might have forgot or someone might have forgot to tell us. My wife will appreciate it.

Happy cutting.

Top 5 Tips for Condensed Cutting Curly Clients

by Ivan Zoot/The Clipper Guy on Monday, August 30th, 2010

ivan zoot

Ivan Zoot is the director of education and customer engagement for the Andis Company and the founder of Zoot! Hair professional hair care products. Ivan identifies, recruits, trains and manages Andis’ team of professional beauty industry educators. Ivan continues to be a featured presenter at industry shows and events, sharing his unique blend of information, education and enthusiasm for clipper cutting and the entire professional beauty industry. Ivan’s background includes experiences ranging from salon ownership to achieving 3 Guinness World Haircutting records.

We have explored how curly hair is different from a cutting perspective. This time, let’s look at one of my favorite curly cutting techniques. Condensed cutting has benefits for all hair types. It works great on curly hair. Your clients will love it and you will, too.

Traditional hair cutting relies on small sections and precision distribution of hair. Condensed cutting is a technique where multiple sections are gathered together, condensed, and cut as one. This creates movement and texture vastly different form traditional sectioning and cutting.

Here are my top 5 tips on why condensed cutting is ideal for curly clients.

1. Movement: Condensing sections creates increases and decreases in hair length across the curve of the head. These changes in length create movement in the hair design. This is great for curly hair.

2. Texture: Curly texture is best maximized when we do not section, distribute and cut with tension and precision. Hair behaves more naturally. Natural texture is played for all it is worth.

3. Timing: Condensed cutting reduces the time needed to cut. Turn your chair and turn up your profits.

4. Tools: Take your pick. Clippers, scissors and razors all bring interesting added dimension to condensed cuts. Try all your tools and experience the differing results.

5. Sales: When you bring new ideas and techniques to your chair, you bring energy and excitement. Our industry thrives on selling the new and the hot. Position this and other techniques to differentiate yourself and your craft. Clients will flock to your chair.

Try some condensed cutting this week and share your experiences. I look forward to learning of your successes.

Happy cutting.

Top 5 Considerations When Assessing a Curly Client

by Ivan Zoot/The Clipper Guy on Monday, August 16th, 2010

ivan zoot

Ivan Zoot is the director of education and customer engagement for the Andis Company and the founder of Zoot! Hair professional hair care products. Ivan identifies, recruits, trains and manages Andis’ team of professional beauty industry educators. Ivan continues to be a featured presenter at industry shows and events, sharing his unique blend of information, education and enthusiasm for clipper cutting and the entire professional beauty industry. Ivan’s background includes experiences ranging from salon ownership to achieving 3 Guinness World Haircutting records.

I watched a haircutting webinar last week. When a viewer asked the guest artist how the featured technique could be used on curly hair the silence was deafening. Then the babbling, stammering and creative fill-in was comical. He had no answer. What spoke louder was the reality that the shared concept just was not adaptable to the curly client.

It got me thinking. Following are my top five considerations when assessing a curly client and the appropriateness of a given haircut or look.

1. Silhouette: Curly hair gets longer, but it also gets wider and higher. It is important to assess how a given cut, especially one with layers, will fill out and shape up as the impact of length, texture, density and curl effect the overall shape.

2. Surface activation: The degree of wave or curl the client’s hair will display at the target length will impact the overall look. What you see is what you get. You need to be able to see it before you get it.

3. Color: Smooth, straight hair reflects light. Curly hair absorbs light. How will the lengths of the finished look and the degree of surface activation described above impact the overall color of the finished design? Thought should be given to a highlighting/lowlighting plan as a part of the finished look.

4. Hair health: Old hair can be dry and dull. New hair can be shiny and slick. A single strand of hair is older at the ends and newer at the scalp (duh?). How will the client’s overall hair healthy impact your intended look?

5. Home care expectations: Will the client follow your recommendations for the use of home care products? What are the odds that she will be able to recreate the look on a daily basis if she does or does not use proper styling aids and conditioning treatments? Proper home care is vital to the success of whatever plan you hatch.

How are you considering these factors in your design decisions? Share your success and failure stories. We can all learn from them.

Happy cutting.

Clipper Guy: 5 Tips for Clippering Longer Hair

by Ivan Zoot/The Clipper Guy on Monday, July 19th, 2010

ivan zoot

Ivan Zoot is the director of education and customer engagement for the Andis Company and the founder of Zoot! Hair professional hair care products. Ivan identifies, recruits, trains and manages Andis’ team of professional beauty industry educators. Ivan continues to be a featured presenter at industry shows and events, sharing his unique blend of information, education and enthusiasm for clipper cutting and the entire professional beauty industry. Ivan’s background includes experiences ranging from salon ownership to achieving 3 Guinness World Haircutting records.

I am ClipperGuy, always talking clipper cutting. Despite my efforts, too many people associate clipper cutting with very short hair cuts. This is not the case. I support this position with the following top five tips for why clipper cutting is great for longer hair lengths … especially longer lengths of curly and wavy hair.

1. Clipper cutting is fast: High blade speeds and all that cutting power makes for short work of longer-length cutting. In a productivity-based business … time is money. You can safely and accurately cut larger sections of hair. Textured hair is less dependent on precision sectioning in the first place. Let the texture work to your advantage.

2. Clipper cutting is easy: Once you have a few key pointers on unique skills of clipper cutting, even more novice hair cutters can run away with clipper cutting. Learn elements like hand gripping, comb selection and blade positioning and you are ready.

3. Clipper cutting is safer: 22 fast-moving clipper blades are infinitely safer than a single slow razor or a pair of wicked scissor blades.

4. Clipper cutting is healthier: Service providers in our industry are plagued by repetitive motion injuries. Let the tool do the hair and the stressful work. Clippers do the cutting. The motor moves the blades. It is easier, cheaper and far more painless to buy a new clipper. A new arm is not a great option.

5. Clipper cutting is gentle: The fast, smooth and clean cutting action of sharp and properly lubricated clipper blades is easier on the hair. Razors can pull hair and shred the cuticle. They are generally not a great choice for most curly textures. Scissors are the old standard, but 22 of them in a row, powered by a motor, is a nice upgrade.

Are you clipper cutting longer lengths of hair? Come see me and members of the Andis team at shows and events. We are always looking to show clipper cuts that are not what most think of as clipper cuts. Long curly and wavy hair is a great example of this.

The Clipper Guy: Top 5 Tips For Securing Sections

by Ivan Zoot/The Clipper Guy on Monday, June 21st, 2010

ivan zoot

Ivan Zoot is the director of education and customer engagement for the Andis Company and the founder of Zoot! Hair professional hair care products. Ivan identifies, recruits, trains and manages Andis’ team of professional beauty industry educators. Ivan continues to be a featured presenter at industry shows and events, sharing his unique blend of information, education and enthusiasm for clipper cutting and the entire professional beauty industry. Ivan’s background includes experiences ranging from salon ownership to achieving 3 Guinness World Haircutting records.

Clipping and securing hair sections during cutting is a reality of hair cutting. How to clip up and secure hair is a subject of debate. There are concerns of damaging hair with rough clips or harsh tools. There are issues of presentation and theatre. How does the client look during the performance of the cutting service with hair piled up on and all over their head? Here are my top five tips for securing sections during hair cutting.

1. Clip it: Classic sectioning clips are the standard. Today, sectioning clips are better than ever. The new wide-jaw clips are designed to hold larger amounts of hair gently. There are soft-touch, coated clips that are nice to hair and feel great to use. The old-style steel ones can be put to pasture in favor of these newfangled options. If you prefer clips, today’s choices just rock.

2. Knot it: Another option is knotting the hair in subsections. You can subdivide main sections into subsections and twist and lock these in on themselves. These little knotted sections look great, neat and organized, during cutting. There are online tutorials showing how to twist and lock these knots. Try it.

3. Gel it: If the hair you are working with is not too thick, long or heavy, you can secure sections by just loading the hair with a medium-to-firm-hold styling gel. Partings and sections can be laid over and will hold and cling in place. This is my preferred method for sectioning control. I like to work with styling products in the hair for a number of reasons… more on this in my next blog. This reason is to secure sections in a snappy and professional manner.

4. Comb it: You are using a comb to comb; use a comb to lock extra hair up and away. You have plenty of combs. Grab another and use one as a hair clip. Slip it into the hair section and back lock it into place. This works great, looks professional and all those combs are right there at your fingertips, anyway.

5. Customize it: The standard clips or your convenient combs just do not reflect your artistic creativity. It is time to express yourself when in hair cutting mode. I have seen a lot, but I am sure I have not seen it all when it comes to hair section clipping. Chopsticks, pipe cleaners, kids hair accessories, etc. They all can be pressed into service for holding hair. Use a bit of creativity and see what you can come up with.

Try a few of these techniques and discover which one is the right one for you. Maybe it is not just one. Maybe more than one of these are right for you… the right one at the right time on the right client.

I would love to hear of your opinions and success stories. Please share!

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