Posts Tagged ‘curly hair’

Real World, Real Curls

by Modern Salon on Wednesday, September 3rd, 2014

IN THE SALON INDUSTRY, there are two types of people— those who say they can do textured hair and the select group of stylists that specialize in texture hair. Cesar Ramirez, the newest Mizani celebrity stylist and our cover artist, is definitely a member of the latter. Having grown up amidst hairspray and rollers in his family’s small hair salon, the Puerto Rican curl guru knows his way around a diverse clientele base.

Ramirez has trained with some of the beauty industry’s top stylists, and his a-list looks have been featured on shows including Celebrity Apprentice, All About Aubrey, and Lala’s Full Court Life. He also offers his magic to a long list of celebrities (Beyoncé, Jennifer Hudson, Demi Lovato, Ciara, Adrienne Bailon and Rita Ora). But beyond Ramirez’s celebrity work, his unique, artistic approach has graced the runways at Mercedes-Benz New York Fashion Week and have adorned the pages of everything from Vogue and Harper’s Bazar to GQ and Latina Magazine.

With a following of more than 30,000 on Instagram alone (@cesar4styles), it comes as no surprise that the inspiration for this shoot came from social media. While researching, Ramirez found that the super-photoshopped hair images on Pinterest weren’t receiving a lot of attention. Instead, it was the shots of everyday clients and selfies of girls with beautiful hair that were trending. “We wanted to create a ‘real’ feel to the collection; that attracted consumers to see what Mizani can do,” Ramirez says. Mizani products were used on set at the shoot—including the recently released Fiberfyl treatment. “Fiberyfyl is a new strengthening treatment with breakthrough Filloxane technology; a strand-by-strand restorer that fills in weak area of the hair,” Ramirez says. “Traditionally, protein treatments are used for strength, which can result in the hair feeling hard or brittle. Fiberfyl maintains the hair’s pliability and softness.” Since models are constantly on set, the hair takes a beating, so using the Fiberfyl system set us up for success.” With New York City as his backdrop, Ramirez was able to successfully capture the understated cool that every curly girl craves. “Textured hair can be a challenge, but it can also be exciting when you realize the beautiful fabric that you are working with,” he says. “When you successfully achieve the perfect shape and style, it’s so fulfilling.”

Curly Hair Artistry

by CurlStylist on Thursday, February 27th, 2014

Since founding NaturallyCurly 15 years ago, I’ve noticed some unique things about the curl market.

  1. It was largely ignored until recently, despite a world where more than 60 percent of the population has curls, coils and waves.

  2. It exists primarily because of the grass-roots efforts of a small but  growing number of passionate entrepreneurs who have worked to fill the voids they see.

The latest example of this ingenuity is Curly Hair Artistry, a 1-year-old group of curl experts who have banded together to provide education and support to other stylists who have made waves, curls and coils their niche.

“We as hairstylists have come to realize that curly hair should not be treated the way we are taught in cosmetology schools across the globe,” said Scott Musgrave, a curl specialist in Cary, N.C. with 3b ringlets himself. “A simple fact emerges – wavy, curly and multi-textural hair is not treated with respect for what I is but is treated as something to fix.”

Musgrave said he was working on some unique business models with his  own  and started receiving questions from other stylists about how he was doing what he was doing.  He began working with a small group of stylists, and decided to pull together a group of the best curl stylists in the industry – a group that could help each other in this specialized niche.

Curly Hair Artistry was born. The original 20 has grown to more than 85, hailing from all over the globe. Their gathering place is their own gathering place.

“We at Curly Hair Artistry make the art, methods, techniques and the business of working with curly hair a priority,” Musgrave says. “We can influence not only the artists working with curly hair, but more importantly the more than 65 percent of the population who has some form of wave, curl or multi-textural hair who sits in our chairs every day.”

“It’s a natural draw – a passion that creates connections. You see, we are a rare breed and require certain attributes that need nurturing and vision to draw out and improve.”

Dianne Nola of Nola Studio in San Francisco is an enthusiastic member of Curly Hair Artistry, and traveled to the first training symposium in October in Atlanta, where 30 stylists gathered to train with Lorraine Massey, one of the founders of Devacurl.

The members provide each other with the unvarnished truth. Common topics include new product discoveries, the most effective cocktails and the nuances of cutting and coloring curls. They have discussed the cheapest place to buy microfiber towels as well as the most comfortable shoes to wear when you’re doing a 2-hour curly dry cut. They often share stories about difficult clients and business challenges. Stylists post before and after photos, showcasing styles they’re especially proud of.

She said it’s a very supportive community, where the goal is to help each other grow their businesses. They often refer clients to each other.

“It’s completely empowering,” Nola says. “My eyes just keep opening.”

The sky’s the limit for Curly Hair Artistry. Training sessions are coming up in Washington D.C. in May as well as Los Angeles in October. There’s even the possibility of creating a Curl Academy one day where stylists from around the globe could come to learn about latest cutting and coloring techniques for curls, coils and waves.

For me personally, it’s shocking that in 2014 beauty schools don’t address texture in their curriculum, and this isn’t likely to change dramatically in the near future. Most discussions about texture focus on how to chemically straighten it.

I was thrilled to hear about Curly Hair Artistry, which is filling a void.

“Beauty schools may teach about it, but antiquated requirements make it difficult to take the necessary time to really understand all the different curl types, porority, chimstry and what makes curly hair do what it does,” he ssays. “I believe it should be pursued after school, because you can’t make someone like working with something they don’t care about. Not every stylist cares about wavy, curly and multi-textural hair.”

Musgrave’s own obsession began with the corkscrews on his own head, and his frustration with an industry that “mistreats and misinforms those with curly hair.”

While working as a stylist, he read “Curly Girl: The Handbook” by Lorraine Massey.

“Ever since then, I started tweaking my cuts, doing things differently than other stylists,” he said. “It was working. I developed a service experience that changed the way a client is treated and gave them the best information to help them embrace their hair even more.”

For more posts like this, check out Michelle Breyer’s personal blog, The Curly Connection

Styling Curly Hair: 5 Common Mistakes

by CurlStylist on Thursday, September 1st, 2011


Ouidad, Queen of Curls.

The life of a stylist is fraught with trials, triumphs and many tribulations, especially if you choose to specialize in textured tresses. Yes, some mistakes are inevitable no matter how savvy you are as a stylist — but you may be surprised how many common faux pas are avoidable. And, you don’t need years of experience to figure it out, if you’re willing to learn from the wisdom of those who spent decades creating a brave (and curly) new world.

Here, we turn to leading curl experts, and asked: If they knew then what they know now, what nostalgic advice would they share about styling curly hair? Read on for the top 5 lessons of curl-centric veterans — lessons they learned the hard way, so you don’t have to.

1: Set Realistic Expectations

When Ouidad, the “Queen of Curls,” first started styling curly hair, she acknowledges that her idealism took over.

“I wanted to change the world with the haircut that I gave them. I wanted to fix it all and change it all,” Ouidad says. “But it’s impossible to take a head of hair and change it all completely at once. What I learned is to really look at the hair, study all the curl patterns, and learn exactly how much curls shrink, each section, and how they fit within each other when you cut. It’s not like cutting straight hair, you can’t just change it all at once.”

So, instead of having an image of what you think you’re going to do with the client, like change their life, Ouidad encourages up-and-coming stylists to examine the different hair textures, really study them and understand them first.

2: Listening to Your Client

“Let the client talk, don’t talk over them. Just observe them,” says Denis DaSilva, co-owner of New York’s Devachan Salon. “You win over people when you agree with them. If you try to disagree, you’ll never win. Agree with them, and then change them a little to the right or left according to what needs to be done, but never say no.”

No is not a word your clients are going to accept easily. So, experts say, be certain you understand what they want before you react.

“You’re going to have to really listen,” adds Christo. “You’re going to have to analyze their hair, so you can give them options and ideas.”

3: Don’t Treat Curly Clients Like Straight-Haired Clients

Curl experts say you cannot treat curly clients the same way you treat clients with straight hair.

“Most of the time, people with straight hair will let you do whatever you want,” Christo says. “But with curly clients, you have to take into consideration that she has already tried many things and ended up in your chair because you claim you specialize in curly hair. So you have to live up to those expectations.”

And that can mean a much longer consultation for new clients. For example, Christo blocks out an hour for new clients. “We want to make sure that person is going to stay with us because we know we have all the solutions for them,” he says.

He suggests stylists ask themselves if they’re really comfortable styling curly hair. “Anyone can say they do curly hair, but can they really? Or, are they making disasters out there for us to fix?” Christo asks.

4: Don’t Let Curl-Phobia Get the Best of You

Although you may feel fear when first approaching curly clients, don’t give in to it.

“The first 10 years as a stylist, you’re so afraid of clients. When they want what they want, they make you concerned about that. The second ten years, you learn how to present what is better for them, but the end result is they will push you, even though you gave them whatever they wanted,” DaSilva says. “The third ten years, now you’re smarter. You listen, but learn how strategically to put them in a spot where you can always give them more.”

Especially when it comes to color, DaSilva warns that if you give the client too much control, it will be hard to get it back.

“I don’t have confrontations with any clients, but if they say I want a lot of blonde highlights, I’ll put the blonde strategically in places where they will see more blonde, but not necessarily doing more blonde,” he explains. “If they say I want a little red, I may know that warm brown, for them, is red.”

DaSilva says it’s all about understanding how to interpret and balance a client’s wants and needs.

5: Communicate

Curl experts say your words matter a lot when styling curly hair clients.

“If you say, ‘I know exactly what I need to do,’ it just blows up in your face. Even if you do know, it just puts [the curly client] on the defense,” Ouidad says. “It’s essential to talk about how you’re going to work with the hair, what kind of movement you want to put in the hair. You want to be able to verbalize and explain how it’s going to fit and how it’s going to look like when the hair is dry.”

Ouidad says you can ease a curly’s fear by saying things like, “I know layers would be too rough for your hair, or it would shrink too much.” You really want to make sure curly clients know that you’re not going to give them ledges, a pyramid or some other shape they dread — and that you understand their texture.

“Make your client as comfortable and be trusting as possible by saying things that resonate with them,” Ouidad says.

Read all of this bi-annual issue of Texture!

Styling Curly Hair for More Business

by Michelle Breyer on Thursday, September 1st, 2011


Styled at The Damn Salon

With many women trading damaged, flat-ironed hair for more natural curls or textured ‘dos, a growing number of stylists are now focusing on curly-haired clients and their different styling needs.

Learning about styling curly hair not only brings you new business, but can also keep your chair full during down seasons. With so many products and tools to choose from, we break down some of the most popular ways to break into this niche and to keep your business booming.

Education is Key

Stylists across the country are beginning to recognize the growing trend for textured looks, which has prompted an increase in education. Classes can be found across the country, the most prominent coming from New York’s Deva certification classes, which can last anywhere from one to three days, that trains stylists on the art of dry cutting, the no shampoo method, coloring, and styling curly hair. Ouidad also has a New York certification and aids in promoting a newly certified stylists through their extensive email database of curlies.

If you don’t want to commit to just one brand, there are several ways to gain more knowledge on the art of styling curly hair. NaturallyCurly.com hosts “Texture!” each year at ABS Chicago, drawing hundreds of stylists who have the opportunity to ask questions and watch demonstrations from the biggest names in textured tresses.

Attending beauty trade shows can be the biggest bang for your buck in terms of education with curl-friendly product lines such as Ouidad, Hair Rules, As I am, Jane Carter Solution, Tigi and Mizani showcasing the latest techniques for curls and kinks. These shows are also a great place to catch up on valuable business tips. Premiere Orlando hosts over 50 classes dedicated to building your business as a stylist and salon owner during the three-day convention.

Meetup groups are also an invaluable educational opportunity for both consumers and stylists. One of the largest natural hair meet-up groups comes together in the Dallas area, with over 1,600 curlies looking for advice and education on styling curly hair. Meetups are also great marketing tools, especially for stylists who want to help women transition to natural hair. They have the opportunity to show off their skills to a highly engaged audience.

Getting the Word Out

More stylists and salon owners are finding unique ways to promote their curl expertise through social media, meet-ups, and salon events. With over 500 million active users on Facebook, companies, such as Schedulicity, are helping stylists and salon owners fill their appointment books through their business pages.

Social media can be an especially powerful way for stylists to get new clients. Teresa DeLorenzo of Mademoiselle Salon & Spa in Haverford, PA. says online reviews and word of mouth are her main form of recruiting business.

“Having curly hair is like a cult,” she says. “Two curly-haired women meet and right away they start talking about who does their hair.”

Here are examples of how some stylists have taken advantage of styling curly hair to keep their chairs full:

Niche: The Power of the Deva Cut

Shai Amiel
Capella Salon, Studio City, Calif.

Training: Honed curl techniques on his own and trained with Lorraine Massey from Devachan Salon

Background: Since starting in the business fifteen years ago, Amiel has noticed how hard it is for curly-haired clients to find someone skilled in styling curly hair. Over half of Amiel’s clientele has curly or textured hair, and he says adding the curl department has definitely increased retail sales in the salon. “I never really planned on specializing in curly hair, but over the years it just kind of happened,” he adds. “It’s just been a fun ride.”

“So many women with curly hair have been getting bad haircuts as a result of cutting curly hair wet and in big sections,” says Amiel. “I end up fixing many hair disasters by other so called ‘curl specialists.’”

He’s become known as the “curl doctor” and invited Lorraine Massey, author of “Curly Girl: The Handbook,” and Deva product creator to train Capella Salon’s team.

How he Markets His Salon: Amiel also teamed up with Massey to create Charity: Water, an organization committed to bringing clean drinking water to developing countries. The project kicked off at Capella Salon’s Curls Night Out, where stylists demonstrated techniques for styling curly hair, and clients enjoyed wine, champagne, and desserts. Massey was on hand during the event to sign books and answer curly questions. To spread the word of the event, Shai used Facebook and NaturallyCurly.com to ensure that all of the area curlies were invited. The raffle at Curls Night Out raised almost $800 for charity: water.

Best Hair Oils for Curls & Waves

by Megan Dorcey on Thursday, September 1st, 2011

There was a time that the very mention of oils in hair products was considered a negative, but an oil boom has transformed the category, with stylists and their clients clamoring for the latest and greatest in hair oils for their clients’ locks.

“Traditionally, oils weren’t considered desirable because they added weight and tackiness,“ recalled John Davis, co-founder and CEO of AG Hair Cosmetics. “Had you asked me two years ago, I would have told you that all of our products were oil free. People see oils differently now.”

Botanicals

Oils themselves aren’t new. For centuries, women around the world have used botanicals and oils in their hair, giving it a healthy sheen and appealing fragrance.

“Botanicals have been around for a long time,” says Dr. Ali Syed, president of Avlon Industries and master chemist for Syntonics formulations.

Curly clients everywhere are asking for more ways to calm their frizz while ensuring health and shine, and the product companies are answering the call with a plethora of hair oils to choose from.

Argan Oil

AG Hair Cosmetics will launch The Oil in September, an argan-infused product. The new product is designed to smooth and hydrate the hair without weighing it down. The Oil is part of a boom in professional hair care botanical oil-based products that have hit the market. It is one of the hottest, most buzzed about categories in the industry.

Argania spinosa kernel oil (argan oil) has been the superstar of oils, with companies such as Moroccan Oil, Argadir, Amika and DermOrganic creating entire lines based on the oil. Argan oil is produced form the kernals of the argan tree, which is indigenous to southwestern Morocco. The oil softens thick, coarse and unruly hair, bringing shine to lifeless dull hair and even skin. Josie Maran has a full line of oil products including a Bronzing Argon Oil for the body that boasts the ability to leave the skin with a healthy, moisturized glow.

Argan oils are definitely the most popular in this vast market, but many companies have been infusing argan seed oil with other popular health-boosting ingredients such as Pequi and Amla oil. Macadamia Natural Oil, which combines macadamia and argan seed oils.

Michael Cain, the Macadamia Natural Oil’s education manager, says “with the matching of those two oils, the performance of the product is unparalleled as far as the absorbency and as far as the great benefits you get from it.”

Vitamin E provides natural UV protection, which is especially beneficial for color-treated hair but works on all hair types. According to Cain, the combination also “gives your hair elasticity which prevents breakage and split ends.”

Although some people expect hair oils to leave a greasy residue, Cain says these oils can actually have the opposite effect, even with daily use.

Hair Oil Benefits

“A lot of people that have finer hair will typically have an oilier scalp,” he explains. “This helps even out the porosity in your hair.” The oils also speed up blow-drying time, similar to the way oil and water separate.

Certain extracts like aloe vera, which is said to heal minor skin injuries, can help repair a scalp that’s been damaged by chemical processing when combined with oils.

“If the scalp is on the dry side, most of the time, you have to have a combination of the natural and some of the synthetic materials,” Syed says.

“Botanicals have been around for a long time and as the passions and styles changed, things become sort of cyclical,” says Syed.

He adds that botanical oils are gaining popularity among health-conscious consumers who have been “pushing the envelope towards natural ingredients in food, personal care, and health.”

Dana Amador, who works in business development at Amika believes hair oils serve a number of functions.

Protection from the Elements

“Not only do [oils] make your hair smell wonderful, but they also protect your hair against the elements,” Amador says. “Oils are a very natural way to not only condition the hair but to style it and make it look effortlessly perfect.”

Oils can also help to define curls without making the hair look greasy or weighing them down, adds Amador, who happens to have curly hair herself.

One of the pioneers in the recent oil boom is Moroccanoil, which introduced its signature Moroccanoil Treatment three years ago. Driven by the success of the initial products, the company has been introducing new products ever since, says Moroccanoil artistic Director Antonio Corral Calero.

The popularity was especially evident among curly stylists and the stylists who work with them. As a result, the company answered with several curl-specific products containing their argan oil. The popular line now boasts a curl defining mousse, curl control cream, and intense curl cream.

Moroccanoil infuses their argan oil with Vitamin F, Vitamin A, and Vitamin E to protect against free-radicals.

“What makes our curl line so unique is that the formulas work on dry and/or wet hair,” says Calero. “Their formulations not only make styling so much easier, but they also decrease frizz, make curls more manageable, and restore moisture back into the hair. We are all about having the hair feel soft and natural, with no sticky residue.”

Now there are a number of great oils available, including Mizani Supreme Oil, Oscar Blandi’s oil product containing Jasmine oil and Alterna’s Bamboo Smooth Kendi Oil, said to promote healthy hair while delivering shine.

How to Cut Curly Hair

by Kateri Johnson on Thursday, August 18th, 2011

Before You Begin

When cutting curly hair, my first suggestion is to gauge the actual curl pattern in its natural state. During the initial contact, whether it be in person or over the phone, it is important that you request the client come in with dry hair, in the style that they would like to, or usually, wear their hair.

Many times, curlies come in with wet, pulled back hair. This creates a few problems. Curly hair should be cut dry in most cases. As we all know, having the hair wet changes the elasticity of the hair and is the primary culprit for shrinkage after the cut, the one thing all curlies are afraid of.

If the hair is pulled back into a pony, the hair on the surface is not only dry but it is molded into the straight position it was drawn back into. In addition, the center of the hair is damp, creating two different areas of elasticity.

With the hair in the preferred position for the client, you are able to see the heavy areas, areas of multiple texture, mistakes from previous services and the general overall shape of the previous cut or outgrowth.

During the initial meeting with your client, determine the products being used and past chemical services performed, professional or self-administered. Because you will be doing a dry cut, knowledge of any potential product build up, previous coloring or past damage should be taken into account when determining actual hair texture.

All of these factors will alter texture, creating a false image of curl pattern, hydration and elasticity. A clarifier is often needed after a cut to ensure that the curl product you use to highlight the finished cut is allowed to properly perform.

Now is the time to explain to your client what the proper products needed to maintain curl formation are, and how to hydrate the hair. With so many wonderful product lines on the market today, assess who your current curl clientele is and try out different companies to find the right fit.

Newsflash: Drastic Cut Not Needed

Curly hair does not always need a full cut! My favorite saying is, “We get bigger before we get longer,” meaning our hair gains volume before we gain length. Initially, the first cut may include shortening or dusting the length and trimming or correcting the layers.

Once you have established your first cut, another full haircut may not be necessary. When a client wants to grow their hair out, alternating between trimming length and layers should be done.

The area of the hair that receives the most damage is the outside surface and layers of the hair. The area of length, which is the nape area from below the occipital to the base hairline, does not receive as much of a beating. What is always perceived as damaged or dry is the outer surface.

During the cut, the hair will become very big and very frizzy, which is great! While cutting, the hair is forming its silhouette. This makes it easy to see any heavy areas, ledges or blending points. You can see smooth lines forming, perfect curves and roundness. All of this is invisible during a cut when the hair is wet. Dry, the hair’s elasticity is balanced and there is no room for error due to shrinkage.

Natural Prom Hairstyles for 2011

by Alicia Ward on Thursday, May 26th, 2011

Natural Prom Hairstyles for 2011

This year’s prom hairstyles are all about natural, messy and casual looks. Perfectly placed updos have been replaced by long waves, curls and kinks pinned back, braids, twists, romantic, soft updos and messy buns.

Low Curly Ponytail

This look is great for prom because it keeps your hair out of your face during dinner and dancing, but still looks amazing in pics!

Tip: Use a frizz fighting gel to seal your locks so they stay defined and frizz free all night. Another tip is to use clear rubber bands so your look is more elegant.

Side Curly/wavy Ponytail

This is a flirty and fun look—another great look for prom. Easy to achieve and great for dancing. Just grab your curls or wavy pull the hair into a low side pony and put your rubber band on.

Natural Prom Hairstyles for 2011

Tip: To make this look even more elegant or fancy, grab a few strands out of the ponytail and wrap it around your rubber band. This hides the rubber band and gives you a sophisticated look.

Messy is trendy. These prom hairstyles are incredibly stylish, yet aren’t sprayed in place, which is exactly why we went curl happy over them!

Hot New Products from ABS

by ABS '11 on Wednesday, March 16th, 2011

Chicago, IL - In addition to wild new hairstyles and dramatic shows, a number of brands debuted hot new products at this year’s America’s Beauty Show. Here are some of the ones that caught our attention.

Tigi’s Session Series. From Tigi’s Catwalk collection comes the new Session Series, seven new styling products designed to help stylists get high-fashion looks. Some of the standouts inclue Styling Cream, Salt Spray and Work It Hairspray.

Original Moxie. I approached a girl with gorgeous curls on the show floor, and it turned out she recently launched Original Moxie, a line of botanically-enriched, natural products tailored to fit the needs of diverse hair types. Curlies will love Mane Tame, Everyday Leave-in, Shape Shifter, Twist Mist, Hair Blong and Oasis Moisture Gel.

Brazilian Blowout’s Zero. From Brazilian Blowout comes Zero, a new smoothing solution with 0% formaldehyde released before, during or after treatment. It uses a proprietary plant-derived KeraSafe Bonding System to deposit and seal essential amino acids into the hair, lasting up to 12 weeks.

Tigi

Original Moxie

Brazilian Blowout

Other noteworthy products:

Aquage’s Biomega. Aquage launched its new Biomega line, a collection of new styling and texturizing products. Some of the noteworthy products include Behave Smoothing Elixer, Text Me Flexible Taffy and Shake It! Volumie Boosting Activator. Shake It! contains powdered polymers enhanced with omega-rich spirulina that can be combined with other products to increase the hold. The more you shake in, the stronger the hold and volume.

Pravana’s Perfection SmoothOut. Pravana Naturceuticals unveiled new Perfection SmoothOut, a patent-pending formula that smooths frizzy, coarse or curly hair. Perfection’s low pH formula contains no harsh chemicals. The gentle formula allows for cleansing and color services immediately after the SmoothOut. The service lasts eight to 10 weeks when used with Perfection Smoothing Shampoo and Conditioner.

Kenra’s Platinum Recovery Polish. Kenra introduced new Platinum Recovery Polish, an ultra-lightweight restorative leave-in treatment that combats dehydration and smoothes the damaged cuticle of the hair for incredible softness and definition with natural movement. It resists humidity for up to 20 hours, so it’s perfect for blowouts and naturally curly styles.

Biolage Limited Edition Shampoo and Conditioner

Biolage. As part of its Spring Renewal Launch, Biolage introduced a co-branded Limited Edition Shampoo and Conditioner. Products from participating salons will benefit the Conservation Fund’s Go Zero program. In return, Biolage will donate up to $100,000 to the fund to restore America’s forests and offset harmful carbon dioxide emissions. Customers buying the shampoo and conditioner will also receive a free Spring Renewal travel body kit.

Salute to Stylists Contest Reveals Boom in Curl-Friendly Stylists and Salons

by Michelle Breyer on Wednesday, February 16th, 2011

Recently, NaturallyCurly.com launched its two-month long Salute To Stylists contest, asking for your vote for your favorite stylist. Here are your picks for winning stylists!


Congratulations to Grand Prize Winner Sandy Marino of Santo Salon & Spa in Pepper Pike, OH!

Regional Winners:
Region 1 (WA, OR, ID, MT, WY):
Tracy of 7 Salon, Bellevue, WA - 2 reviews

Region 2 (CA, NV, AZ, UT, CO):
Melanie Brown of Curls Gone Wild, Gilbert, AZ - 96 reviews

Region 3 (ND, SD, NE, KS, MN, IA, MO, WI, IL, KY, IN):
Natalie of Natalie Clark Studio, St. Louis, MO - 5 reviews

Region 4 (NM, TX, OK, AR, LA):
Anna Craig of Trashy Roots Salon & Spa, Round Rock, TX - 102 reviews

Region 5 (TN, MS, AL, GA, FL, SC, NC):
Stacy Hill of DyeVerCity Salon, Augusta, GA - 127 reviews

Region 6 (MI, OH, WV, VA, MD, DE, PA, NJ):
Sandy Marino of Santo Salon & Spa, Pepper Pike, OH - 155 reviews

Region 7 (NY, CT, RI, MD, ME, NH, VT):
Julie Washington of The Estuary Salon & Day Spa, South Portland, Maine - 25 reviews

Region 8 (Ontario, Canada):
Nadine Bastien of Aphrodite’s Sanctuary, Toronto, Ontario - 4 reviews

The number of reviews were calculated from 12/15/10 to 2/15/11


Vicki Vela-Cambruzzi

Business is booming for Vicki Vela-Cambruzzi at Curls On Top in Laguna Beach

If anybody had told veteran stylist Vickie Vela-Cambruzzi five years ago she would be opening a salon dedicated to curlies, she would have told them “Get out of town!”

That was before Vela-Cambruzzi, a curly herself, saw the light. Or in her case, experienced the magic of a Deva cut, a cut at the hands of “Curly Girl” author Lorraine Massey at a hair show. The cut was her best ever—changing her whole perception of her curls—and she saved her money to go to a DevaConcepts Curlaboration to learn the dry-cutting technique herself. Less than a year later, she opened Curls On Top Salon in Laguna Beach, a salon focused on the needs of curlies. Business is booming at the 1-year-old salon, where curlies travel from outside California to get a Deva cut. “It’s been incredible,” says Vela-Cambruzzi.

Many curlies grew up at a time when few stylists knew how to work with curls, and most now have numerous war stories to tell about the bad haircuts and the botched chemical services they received. When NaturallyCurly.com launched 13 years ago, a handful of stylists and salons focused on the needs of women with wavy, curly and kinky hair. Most stylists once viewed curls as something to “fix” by straightening it or shearing it short.

Vela-Cambruzzi is part of the growing legion of stylists who have made curls their focus to help girls—and guys—with curls love their natural texture. This trend has been fueled by rising demand from women who want to work with their natural texture as well as the increased availability of curl training, thanks to curl specialists like DevaConcepts and Ouidad.

During the two-month Salute to the Stylists contest, which wrapped up yesterday, more than 315 new salons were added, promoting the skills of stylists around the United States and Canada.

Texture: Curl Expertise from Top Stylists

by Michelle Breyer on Saturday, January 29th, 2011

Texture Tips

Top stylists offer expert tips

When a curly client sits in your chair, they are looking to you as the expert. It’s your job to educate them on how to properly care for their locks at home or on the road. Modern Salon asked its Proview Panel how they are helping their textured clients enhance/care for their natural curl. Here’s the tips and tricks they had to offer:


“I find that a diffuser and little mussing with the fingers, hands or brush are the best ways to enhance curls and eliminate frizz. Many product manufacturers have wonderful shampoos, conditioners and finishing products to work with a diffuser. My favorite would be a cream-based styling product with a light amount of hold within.”

—Pat Helmandollar, president of Savy Salon and Day Spa in Cornelius in North Carolina


“My clients who are embracing their texture are opting for reduced bulk. I am removing weight within a hair cut so the ends are not thin, but chunky with a more flat appearance to the style.”

—Tammie Terczynski, Matrix Artistic Educator of Salon Envie in Wausau, Wisconsin


“The focus has to be on proper home maintenance. Too often a client wants what they do not have naturally, and if texture is what they want, then practical techniques are paramount. From the proper cut, to the styling products and tools—make sure your guest is willing, ready and able to maintain her textured style!”

—Ian Marc Smith, owner of Imagine Salon & Spa in Bedford in Nova Scotia


“I have hosted special evenings for clients with textured hair in the education facility at the salon showing them styling techniques that can enhance or minimize their specific textural issues.”

—Steve Napier, Master Stylist/Education Manager of J. Bentley Studio and Spa, in Columbus, Ohio


“When my guest has curly hair, I show them a better way to bring out their curls by doing Ouidad’s Rake and Shake method. If my guest has fine hair, I disconnect the hair in order to achieve more volume for them.”

—Keri-lyn Cleaver, Director of Education/Senior Stylist of Salon Ya Ya, Nashville, Tenn.



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