Posts Tagged ‘Anna Craig’

Trendy Curly Updos for Weddings & Proms

by Alicia Ward on Friday, June 3rd, 2011

Wedding and prom season are here! We’ve got the run down on the last curly hairstyle trends for formal events this year. Veteran stylist Anna Craig of Trashy Root Salon & Spa, show us how to achieve two trendy looks for this formal event season. Craig, Pravana Artistic Educator and DevaCurl Specialist, with over nine years of experience loves updos and shows us how to achieve these looks at home with ease.

Curly Updos
Curly Updos

Updos for Wavies (Type 2) and Curlies (Type 3)

Step 1: Start by diffusing and applying gel. Apply gel first then diffuse till dry completely dry.

Step 2: Start on the bottom half of the hair and pull curl by curl and pin to the side—right behind the ear (slightly to the side).

Step 3: Twist some pieces, while alternating side, keep the hair loose and kind of messy. It shouldn’t be perfect.

Step 4: Part to the side: Then start twisting the top—alternate side to side—keep it loose do not pull on the curl. Pin, alternating side to side.

Step 5: Leave a few pieces in front (only if the client has shorter bang pieces/framing).

Step 6: Complete the look with aerosol hair spray.

Curly Updos
Curly Updos

Updos for Kinkies (Type 4)

Step 1: Take small sections and French braid them around the head.

Step 2: Angle the pattern toward one side to give it more style.

Step 3: Pin the ends into the braids. It’s a very simple style.

Step 4: Can add flowers or a clip to accentuate the look.

8 Tips for Creating Perfect Wedding Hairstyles

by Alicia Ward on Tuesday, May 31st, 2011

8 Tips for Perfect Wedding Hairstyles

Veteran stylist Anna Craig of Trashy Root Salon & Spa offers 8 tips to help your client get the perfect wedding hairstyle.

1. Ask for a photo

Always help your client select a picture to show you of someone with a similar hair type.

2. Think length

Talk to your client about length right away! Remind her if she want to rock longer locks on her wedding day make sure you are open to clip in or permanent extensions.

3. Suggest something new

Make sure to give your client a different look. It’s her BIG day—go fancy!

4. Keep her dry

Make sure to use a product that fights frizz and humidity. Look for products that contain anti-humectants.

5. Ask her to show up ready

Remind your client to wear her hair into the salon straight or curly, depending on the final style.

6. Apply more product than normal

7. Remind her to book a trial

Encourage your client to book a trial run. This will give her an idea of what her final look with be.

8. Hands off the hair!

Tell your client not to mess with her hair when it’s wet to keep frizz at a minimum.

Are Sales Important in the Salon Industry?

by Trash Talk with Anna Craig on Monday, November 8th, 2010

anna craig

Hair has been Anna Craig’s passion since she was 12 years old, this has always been her path in life. In 2001 she went to school in Tempe, AZ, at the Carsten Aveda Institute. After doing hair for about 5 years, she realized that precision haircuts were her specialty, after years of thinking that color was her calling. After doing hair in Arizona for several years, she took the plunge and moved to Texas, and her career took off. She soon opened her own salon, Trashy Roots Salon & Spa. There she became a Certified Deva Stylist, specializing in Curly Girl haircuts. She is also an Artistic Educator for Pravana, which gives her the opportunity to go out to different salons in the area and educate them on new products and techniques. She is also very involved in her community; holding annual cut-a-thons, participating in benefit hair shows, and helping with local beauty schools.

As stylists, we are always being told to sell, sell, sell. Retail sales play a very important role in the salon. This assures that your client is using the best products for their specific hair and that they can replicate their look at home. Salon products are by far superior to store-bought products, are only guaranteed if bought in a salon, and are 10-15% less expensive if bought in a salon versus the grocery store.

By educating your client with this information, clients won’t feel like you are just trying to sell them junk to make a profit. Sometimes clients feel as if we are just trying to make our commission off of them and that we don’t really care what they purchase as much as how much they purchase. If a client purchases retail from you, this shows that they trust you and your referral. The entire time you are working on your client you need to be asking about what products they use at home and what products you are using on them. Then when you are finished with the client, take them to the front and talk again about what products you recommend.

Each time put the product in the client’s hand, the more they touch the product the more they feel attached and the more likely they are to buy the product. Talk about the different key points of your products (ie: if they are green, organic, natural, perfume-free, alcohol-free, etc) because clients want to know the differences between what your salon offers and what salons down the street offer. By carrying a unique line that isn’t offered everywhere in your area, this will assure that clients have to return to your salon to purchase the product that only you offer. Also by carrying products that don’t get diverted to the grocery store helps your sales because they can’t find the product anywhere else. Even if you just sold your client products the last time they came into the salon, don’t assume they don’t want to purchase again. Talk about their children and spouse and what they are using—sometimes their kids are stealing their products and they might need their own. Alert your client of all the retail sales that are going on in your salon. If the client is on a budget this might encourage them to buy because their favorite product is on a deal.

As a stylist you are also selling yourself and your image. When you meet a stranger in public, do you tell them that you do hair and talk about where you work? When you leave a tip in a restraunt do you leave business cards? Does person you know that you do hair? Are you getting a lot of repeat clientele? Do you hand every single client that leaves your chair your business card? If you said no to any of these, you are not doing the job of selling yourself. Clients can go to any other stylist— they’re not bound to you by contact. But you want them to only choose you. From the first time you do their hair you want them to be sold on you and only you. They need to know your name, have plenty of your business cards, know your schedule, and have your salon phone number.

It’s amazing that so many stylists forget those key little points. Your clients should fall in love with you doing their hair. By doing a little extra at each an every appointment, they won’t get over you and find someone else. Clients call up at the salon all the time and can’t recall who did their hair last and don’t really care who they see and that means they weren’t sold on a stylist. You want that salon phone to be ringing and for everyone to be asking for you. Referrals are our best advertising resource and the best way to know that your clients love you if they are referring you to everyone they know. Even if a client has been coming to me for years I still treat them like the first time they came in the door. We are selling an image and you are your best advertisement. So look the part, look like a hair stylist. If people never assume you do hair then you need to work on selling your look too.

7 Steps for Dealing with Salon Drama/Diva Stylists

by Trash Talk with Anna Craig on Monday, October 18th, 2010

anna craig

Hair has been Anna Craig’s passion since she was 12 years old, this has always been her path in life. In 2001 she went to school in Tempe, AZ, at the Carsten Aveda Institute. After doing hair for about 5 years, she realized that precision haircuts were her specialty, after years of thinking that color was her calling. After doing hair in Arizona for several years, she took the plunge and moved to Texas, and her career took off. She soon opened her own salon, Trashy Roots Salon & Spa. There she became a Certified Deva Stylist, specializing in Curly Girl haircuts. She is also an Artistic Educator for Pravana, which gives her the opportunity to go out to different salons in the area and educate them on new products and techniques. She is also very involved in her community; holding annual cut-a-thons, participating in benefit hair shows, and helping with local beauty schools.

Save the drama for your mama! There is always one stylist in every salon that thinks their s*** doesn’t stink and that they don’t have to arrive on time or clean up after themselves. Dealing with Salon Drama has been one of my most difficult issues. It has been one of the hardest things to learn how to handle. Having one bad seed can ruin the atmosphere of an entire salon. I felt like it was holding us captive in our own salon. When I opened my salon two years ago, my goal was to be a great, friendly and understanding owner, not like some of the owners I had worked for in my past. I was going to be different. But it didn’t take long to get run over by a freight train of cancerous stylists. My feelings kept getting hurt, and it was hard to handle. I was about to throw in the towel several times and just give up. I had to get thicker skin, and I had to take charge of my investment, my love, my life, my future, my salon. This didn’t happen overnight but slowly I have come to take back salon and learn how to deal with drama.

Here are ways to take back the control in and get rid of the cancer in your salon:

1. Set your standards from day one—put it in writing up front so they understand your salon’s expectations. Have a detailed handbook that explains exactly what you expect from each stylist.

2. Lead by example—don’t be a diva yourself. No one wants to work for a diva, either. Being a positive force in your salon is always key. If you have rules, you have to follow them, too.

3. Choose to be a friend or a boss. Which is more important to you; your business or being popular? Sometimes you have to be the bad guy to get the job done.

4. Don’t let it get out of control. Avoiding an issue will not make it go away. Stop the situation before it goes spinning out of control. If a stylist is taking charge in a negative way don’t wait until it’s too late. Nip it in the bud.

5. Let them go. Don’t be afraid to fire the stylist who is ruining your business. This is a hard one, but in the end you and your business will benefit. Keeping them around will only make things worse for you and everyone else in the salon.

6. Don’t let the drama spread to other stylists. If you have one bad seed it can spread to other stylists. Other stylists might start picking up bad habits by watching this Diva Stylist. If she doesn’t clean up, why do I have to? If she doesn’t have to show up for meetings, why do I have to? If she doesn’t show up on time, why do I have to? Stop it before it runs in your salon like wild fire.

7. The biggest point of all, it’s your name on the door. It is your reputation at stake. Don’t let one stylist ruin your dream. Once you are free of the drama you will be so glad you took control back. You will walk into your salon every day with a smile.

Take your salon back!

Is Hair Your Passion?

by Trash Talk with Anna Craig on Monday, September 20th, 2010

anna craig

Hair has been Anna Craig’s passion since she was 12 years old, this has always been her path in life. In 2001 she went to school in Tempe, AZ, at the Carsten Aveda Institute. After doing hair for about 5 years, she realized that precision haircuts were her specialty, after years of thinking that color was her calling. After doing hair in Arizona for several years, she took the plunge and moved to Texas, and her career took off. She soon opened her own salon, Trashy Roots Salon & Spa. There she became a Certified Deva Stylist, specializing in Curly Girl haircuts. She is also an Artistic Educator for Pravana, which gives her the opportunity to go out to different salons in the area and educate them on new products and techniques. She is also very involved in her community; holding annual cut-a-thons, participating in benefit hair shows, and helping with local beauty schools.

Since from before I could remember I have always wanted to be a hairstylist. When I was little I would have my mother make my sister let me practice styling her hair—my favorite do was the French Twist. I even had my bedroom set up with two vanity tables in it, so it could be my very own salon.

So when I was 12 I went to a weeklong church camp, and at the end of the week each child had to get up in front of all the parents and announce what we our dreams were and what we wanted to do when we grew up. I stood up and said I wanted to be a hairdresser. My mother was mortified. I never heard the end of it all the way home—she had never been so embarrassed.

That was the end of my dream for quite some time. I went on to dream of architecture, nursing, etc.—anything but being a hairstylist. I received scholarships to a large university to study architecture, and my family was so proud. I come from a family heavy into construction.

So when I decided to drop out of college to go to hair school, my parents were not too happy. They made it almost impossible to go to cosmetology school, so I decided to go back to college. I spent the next couple years changing schools and majors several times, meanwhile always doing everyone’s hair, make-up, and nails before any event.

I finally just dropped out of college completely. Then one day my mom and I were at the hairdresser just talking with him and I just mentioned that working with hair is what I’ve always wanted to do. My mom suggested that maybe I should go to cosmetology school after all, finally. So the next day we toured every school in Phoenix, Arizona, and picked the most perfect school for me.

I have now been doing hair for almost 10 years and I know that this is what I was meant to do, I couldn’t see myself doing anything else. I have owned my own salon for 2 years and I feel like each year I keep growing as a stylist and I just get better and better. I had a client ask me this year “what do you want to do when you grow up?” and I answered “I’m already there”. She was actually quite shocked. I think some clients assume that we didn’t really choose to be a hairstylist, that we really just failed out of school or couldn’t find anything better to do. But there are so many hairstylists like me that just love, love, love what they do and we need to spread the love of our industry into our business and show our clients. This isn’t just a job or a temporary stepping stone until something better comes along, this is our life. As a hairstylist is it yours? Or is it just a job?

Get Your Clients’ Locks Fall Fashion Ready!

by Alicia Ward on Monday, September 20th, 2010

Fall Curly

Time to transition to fall. Follow these tips to get your clients’ locks ready for the fall fashion season!

As the heat starts to fad and cool nights begin to increase we all start to think about how to prepare for fall. With the changing of the seasons often comes the changing of our clients’ hair colors. Veteran stylist Anna Craig of Trashy Roots Salon & Spa, has six tips to help your clients transition to the perfect fall look. Craig, Pravana Artistic Educator and DevaCurl Specialist, has more nine years of experience, and is extremely passionate about colors. She ensures if you follow her steps, your clients will be fall-ready in no time!

3 steps to getting your client’s hair ready for fall color change

1. Deep Condition: Tell your clients to use a great deep conditioner a week prior to their dye appointment. You want to make sure their hair is strong and healthy. Make sure to tell them to do this around a week out—too close to their appointment will prohibit the color from fully penetrating.

2. Clarify: Talk to clients about clarifying. Ask them to clarify their hair to remove build up at least three days prior to their appointment. This will remove any access build up before their hair gets its new fall look.

3. Hydrate: Inform them to use a hydrating conditioner for one week prior to their appointment including after their clarifying treatment. Hydrating conditioners are a great wavy to lock in your clients moisture without coating the hair too thick to prevent color penetration.

3 Steps Color Change for Fall

Transitioning your clients’ summer locks to fall is a slow and steady process that allows you to have control and create a gradual transformation that is completed correctly.

1. Add depth! Slowly start to add depth back into the client’s hair via lowlights. Just an initial shading. You don’t want to go too dark at first.

2. 5 weeks later add more depth by weaving in more dark pieces

3. 7 weeks later add additional depth. Majority of the time this will be the final step of the fall color transformation however, it may take additional time if you want you change to be even more gradual.

5 Tips To Better Client Communication

by Alicia Ward on Tuesday, September 7th, 2010

We’ve all had clients leave our chair unhappy, and thought to ourselves “I wish I could have done that differently.”

Client communications is the key to success in this business—we all need to be great listeners and communicators. If you ask a client what she wants in a hairdresser, she will tell you “a stylist who listens to and understands my needs.” If you ask a hairdresser what happened when a client leaves unhappy, he or she will tell you “there was a miscommunication” or “the client could not explain what she wanted.” Veteran stylist Anna Craig of Trashy Roots Salon & Spa has five tips to better client communication. Anna, a Pravana Artistic Educator and DevaCurl Specialist, with more than nine years of experience, is extremely passionate about client communication and says if you follow her steps, your clients won’t ever leave the salon unhappy again!

Here are 5 easy tips to better your client communication.

1:Confidence! You are the expert, so take control of the situation. Be clear and confident. Never let the client take over the appointment by asking you to see the swatch book or the scissors you will be using. You need to keep the control during the appointment and assure your client that you know best. Make sure you sound and act confident. You know your colors, brands and supplies, so make sure you act like it. If you are unsure about something with your client consult another stylist in your salon, but always be in charge.

2:Consult! Always do thorough consultations prior to the appointment. Some clients lack good communication skill,s so it is your job to ask lots of questions to ensure you deliver the right results. Always ask clients to bring photos of the color, cut or style she is looking for. Ask her about her hair history. Make sure you are aware of what they have done to your hair. Talk to her about her expectations and make sure they understand the reality of the situation. Know their hair type and discuss it with them. Ask them about what products they are using. The more questions the better. The consult should range from 15 to 30 minutes for large changes and around 10 minutes for minor changes.

3:Document! Document your client’s history. Writing down everything you’ve done for your client will ensure a smooth appointment next time. Keeping records of your clients makes the client confident in you and your work. Not only does this allow you to be better prepared for their next appoint but it also helps you keep your clients happy and coming back. This is a great way to book you next appointment “I just noted everything we did today in your account so at your 5 week touch up we will get the same results “.

4:Educate! Educate your client about what you are doing. The more you can tell the client, the better your communication will be. Talking your clients through things helps her feel confident and part of the process, which enables trust. Keeping your clients involved is key because it opens the channels of communication, garnering better results.

5:Products! Know the products your client uses to ensure her results will last. Most clients are uneducated about professional products and the role they play in long-term maintenance. Talk to your client about her current products; recommend products and other maintenance options. You know the benefits of the right products, so do not keep your client in the dark. Share your product knowledge so she can love their hair longer.

Say goodbye to unhappy clients and client miscommunication—follow these 5 steps to get the better your client communication!

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