Archive for the ‘Stylist Spotlight’ Category

How to Cope With A Bad Curly Haircut

by CurlStylist on Friday, June 13th, 2014

photo Theresa Harrison

Neel Morley is the owner of the first hair salon in Melbourne, Australia that is completely dedicated to curly hair. These are his tips on how to deal with a bad curly haircut. Visit the Neel Loves Curls blog here, and like his salon on Facebook here. You may also book online here.


This is a question is often talked about when a client comes in with their Christmas tree haircut or a curly haircut thats been attacked by a razor!


It’s devastating and when people have searched for a curly hair specialist to help their curl recover.

If you are walking out of a salon with your hair blow-dried straight then you will have no idea what it looks like afterwards when it returns curly. It’s not uncommon for people with curly to go home and re do their hair after a haircut. What other service do you have where you have to re do it?

Some curlies say to their peers, “Try it yourself!”

“Use strong pins to pin sections back to mix it up and change the shape.”

I’ve also heard “Try changing your part line,” or “Style it a different way!”

“Headbands and hair accessories are useful. Add a beanie if you can.”

“Having to artificially curl your hair as it doesn’t do it naturally anymore!”

“Accept the possibility of going shorter for a stronger curly hair shape, better to have it short and styled than a mid-length nightmare.”

I would normally say to to cut it shorter if its been razored or thinning scissors used, as the hair is then beyond repair.

It’s just not salvageable and the curls have been badly deformed this way.I would use the internet to find a curly hair dresser and search online for 3 possible curly/wavy haircuts that may suit to take them to the hairdressers. Going along with 30 photos on your iPad isn’t very clear as to what you are actually looking for!
The only good part about a bad curly haircut is that it may have given you the option of trying something new with your hair which in the past you may not have been open to. You could go back and ask the stylist to re cut it .Sometimes a few snips is all that it actually needs. The most important question for a curly haired person is to know that they are going to cut your hair dry as curly hair springs ups so much once it dries.You should be leaving the salon with your hair dry so that you know exactly what your curly haircut is going to look like.

Forums on curly hair are a great source of information.

Once you know the correct things to say, that will limit bad curly haircuts after all prevention is better than the cure. Most people with curly hair have suffered a bad curly haircut a few times in their life.More people are learning about their curls/waves and are learning to be more direct with what they want. I sometimes feel that I am doing more than what my job is as I am teaching someone to love what nature gave them. Sometimes the worst curly haircut can make you Google to see if there is someone out there that can actually cut curly hair!!!

How Toxic is Your Hair Salon? 3 Scary Salon Waste Facts

by CurlStylist on Thursday, May 29th, 2014

toxic salon
Alarmingly, the majority of salon waste such as hair color and foils, ends up down the drain and into our water supply or in the trash and headed to a landfill. George the salon Chicago is combating the toxic effects of beauty services by starting a new program that recycles & reuses 95% of their total waste. Please see more information on this below along with 3 scary salon waste facts.

George the salon Chicago Now Recycling 95% of Salon Waste with New Program

Once considered garbage, leftover hair, foils, color tubes, paper, plastics, and liquid chemicals will now be recycled and reused at this Chicago salon

While some industries have access to paid recycling for paper and plastic, the bulk of salon waste – hair, metals, excess chemicals, and much more – has always been destined for the trash bin and sink.

In an effort to change this alarming fact and significantly reduce their environmental impact, George the salon Chicago is proud to begin a new comprehensive recycling / reuse program, ensuring 95% of their waste is reprocessed. This program founded by Green Circle Salons will redirect daily waste like hair, foils, color tubes, paper, plastics, and liquid chemicals out of our water streams and landfills, creating environmental accountability in the beauty industry. Now with each salon visit, clients of George the salon will contribute to local and international community development, as well as environmental research and innovation for a healthier planet.

Did you know hair when placed in garbage bags will mummify, continue to fill our landfill, and give off methane gas?

George the salon will now be diverting all hair out of landfills and into other more sustainable projects. Green Circle Salons, in connection with various partners, is looking at ways that hair can play an important role in a number of commercial applications. It’s exciting to know that hair can be used on our oceans to help in oil spill cleanup and recovery projects.

Did you know that currently all aluminum foils and color tubes are not being recycled and are sent to landfill?

Recycling aluminum uses roughly 5% of the energy required to create virgin aluminum from bauxite. 95% of all aluminum can be recycled over and over again, including the foils and color tubes that are used in salons across North America. Now properly recycled, this will help to reduce the need for more landfill space, reduce our dependence on non-renewable resources, and decrease the amount of toxins going into our landfill sites.

Did you know that all excess chemicals including color, perm solutions and ammonia get rinsed down the sink into our water stream?

This is the ugly truth of the industry. Our solution will be to send all excess color waste to a hazardous waste facility where they will be incinerated to produce clean energy!


This was written for George the Salon in Chicago, IL.

Haircuts for Curly Hair: Movement, Dimension, and Layers…Oh My!

by CurlStylist on Thursday, March 27th, 2014

haircuts for curly hair

With over 20 years of experience in the professional curly industry, senior stylist Leslie Ellen Abbate has seen trends come and go, especially being located on the popular, upscale 5th Avenue in New York City. Her love of the modern woman’s hair and beauty has taken her far in her career, and clients appreciate it. Leslie Ellen doesn’t only consider herself a stylist, but rather an enhancer of dramatic style and lifestyle changes.

CurlStylist: Introduce yourself.

Leslie Ellen Abbate: I am so passionate about what I do. My focus is to work with the natural beauty of your hair to achieve your desired look. I love and specialize in hair makeovers, which can dramatically change your style. My goal is to make you look stylish and feel beautiful. Every client is so special to me. I would love to show you how hair color and highlights would add dimension to your look.

CurlStylist: How did you enter the curly salon industry?

Leslie Ellen Abbate: I am a curly girl! For years I was saddened by one unfortunate haircut after another. I knew there had to be a better way. I have always been particularly fascinated by the beauty and versatility of curls. Because of these reasons, I have dedicated my styling techniques to fit the individual needs of those with curly hair.

CurlStylist: What inspires you throughout the day?
Leslie Ellen Abbate: I feel blessed and inspired by the love of God everyday. I am humbled and in awe that I can to do what I love and be used as a vessel.
CurlStylist: What are your favorite curly hair cuts or styles?
Leslie Ellen Abbate: My favorite thing to enhance a curly girl is to add some movement and dimension. This is can be achieved buy adding some layers and a bayalage. Curly hair should always have some sort of layering. I love to give some movement and life, back  to the hair. Without layering, it can be flat and triangular. As you elevate and layer the hair, it creates movement and frames the face.

CurlStylist: What are some hair trends you’re seeing in NY?
Leslie Ellen Abbate: Bayalage has been around for a while but has really been taken the spotlight lately. It is a way of highlighting the hair without foils. It is a more natural dimensional look, great to hug the curls and add dimension without it being too light or obvious that you added some lightness.

CurlStylist: What is one thing you wish every curly man or woman knew about their hair?

Leslie Ellen Abbate: Do not disturb the curls. The curls have their families they belong with and once separated they will frizz.

CurlStylist: Where is your shop located and how can we schedule an appointment?
Leslie Ellen Abbate: I am currently renting a space at Capelli D’Oro, a bright, airy salon overlooking the buzz of 5th Avenue, in the Flatiron district, at 123 5th Avenue, New York City. Call me directly for an appointment at 718-926-4050. You will enjoy the ambiance of the salon, with its great welcoming energy.

Stylist Jason Leo Hurst on West Coast Hair Trends

by CurlStylist on Tuesday, March 4th, 2014

Jason Leo Hurst of Dej Salon in Sherman Oaks, CA is a veteran stylist with 16 years experience in the hair industry. Being less than a thirty minute drive from Los Angeles, Jason has seen it all when it comes to hair and beauty. But before being well known on the west coast for his hair artistry, Jason actually kicked off his career in Soho, NYC at the Devachan Salon. The founders of DevaCurl helped Jason mold and perfect his craft, and before he knew it, he was in California practicing his passion. I recently chatted with him to pick his brain about the latest and greatest in the west coast curly community.

CurlStylist: Where do you find daily inspiration?

Jason Leo Hurst: I love helping curly girls that are desperately seeking solutions. I constantly hear things like “I’ve tried every product” and “I cannot find anyone who understands my hair.”

CS: What are your favorite curly hair cuts or styles to perform on clients?

JLH: I love big hair! My favorites are long, layered, and full. I also enjoy cutting angular bobs with an edge.

CS: Which hair products do you love to use?

JLH: I love DevaCurl’s NoPoo. It’s simplicity and performance transforms dry textured hair while preserving hair color like no other! Elita makes a hair mask that is also great. I use it solely as a leave-in styling aid in the dryer. It truly performs. It has just the right amount of emollients to provide shine and weight to control frizz! Having only one hair product for my clients to use is truly life changing for them!

CS: What are some hair trends you are seeing a lot of nowadays?

JLH: Balayage hair color and beach waves!

CS: Finally, what is one thing you wish every curly man or woman knew about their hair?

JLH: I want them to know that it CAN be easy!

If you are in the Sherman Oaks area, you may book an appointment with Jason at Dej Salon on the website, www.dejsalon.com. Or, contact the salon by phone at (818) 981-4440.

Curly Hair Artistry

by CurlStylist on Thursday, February 27th, 2014

Since founding NaturallyCurly 15 years ago, I’ve noticed some unique things about the curl market.

  1. It was largely ignored until recently, despite a world where more than 60 percent of the population has curls, coils and waves.

  2. It exists primarily because of the grass-roots efforts of a small but  growing number of passionate entrepreneurs who have worked to fill the voids they see.

The latest example of this ingenuity is Curly Hair Artistry, a 1-year-old group of curl experts who have banded together to provide education and support to other stylists who have made waves, curls and coils their niche.

“We as hairstylists have come to realize that curly hair should not be treated the way we are taught in cosmetology schools across the globe,” said Scott Musgrave, a curl specialist in Cary, N.C. with 3b ringlets himself. “A simple fact emerges – wavy, curly and multi-textural hair is not treated with respect for what I is but is treated as something to fix.”

Musgrave said he was working on some unique business models with his  own  and started receiving questions from other stylists about how he was doing what he was doing.  He began working with a small group of stylists, and decided to pull together a group of the best curl stylists in the industry – a group that could help each other in this specialized niche.

Curly Hair Artistry was born. The original 20 has grown to more than 85, hailing from all over the globe. Their gathering place is their own gathering place.

“We at Curly Hair Artistry make the art, methods, techniques and the business of working with curly hair a priority,” Musgrave says. “We can influence not only the artists working with curly hair, but more importantly the more than 65 percent of the population who has some form of wave, curl or multi-textural hair who sits in our chairs every day.”

“It’s a natural draw – a passion that creates connections. You see, we are a rare breed and require certain attributes that need nurturing and vision to draw out and improve.”

Dianne Nola of Nola Studio in San Francisco is an enthusiastic member of Curly Hair Artistry, and traveled to the first training symposium in October in Atlanta, where 30 stylists gathered to train with Lorraine Massey, one of the founders of Devacurl.

The members provide each other with the unvarnished truth. Common topics include new product discoveries, the most effective cocktails and the nuances of cutting and coloring curls. They have discussed the cheapest place to buy microfiber towels as well as the most comfortable shoes to wear when you’re doing a 2-hour curly dry cut. They often share stories about difficult clients and business challenges. Stylists post before and after photos, showcasing styles they’re especially proud of.

She said it’s a very supportive community, where the goal is to help each other grow their businesses. They often refer clients to each other.

“It’s completely empowering,” Nola says. “My eyes just keep opening.”

The sky’s the limit for Curly Hair Artistry. Training sessions are coming up in Washington D.C. in May as well as Los Angeles in October. There’s even the possibility of creating a Curl Academy one day where stylists from around the globe could come to learn about latest cutting and coloring techniques for curls, coils and waves.

For me personally, it’s shocking that in 2014 beauty schools don’t address texture in their curriculum, and this isn’t likely to change dramatically in the near future. Most discussions about texture focus on how to chemically straighten it.

I was thrilled to hear about Curly Hair Artistry, which is filling a void.

“Beauty schools may teach about it, but antiquated requirements make it difficult to take the necessary time to really understand all the different curl types, porority, chimstry and what makes curly hair do what it does,” he ssays. “I believe it should be pursued after school, because you can’t make someone like working with something they don’t care about. Not every stylist cares about wavy, curly and multi-textural hair.”

Musgrave’s own obsession began with the corkscrews on his own head, and his frustration with an industry that “mistreats and misinforms those with curly hair.”

While working as a stylist, he read “Curly Girl: The Handbook” by Lorraine Massey.

“Ever since then, I started tweaking my cuts, doing things differently than other stylists,” he said. “It was working. I developed a service experience that changed the way a client is treated and gave them the best information to help them embrace their hair even more.”

For more posts like this, check out Michelle Breyer’s personal blog, The Curly Connection

Beauty Industry West’s Legend of Beauty Luncheon

by CurlStylist on Wednesday, January 15th, 2014

Every other year, Beauty Industry West’s Board of Directors selects a recipient for the Legend of Beauty Award based upon the criteria of an innovator whose thinking, commitment and practices have changed the direction of our industry in significant ways, and one who has contributed to the advancement of the beauty industry as a whole.

This year John Paul DeJoria was selected, and he will share his experience in co-founding John Paul Mitchell Systems, the initial challenges, as well as his environmental commitment and distribution choices that have distinguished him as a true leader in the professional beauty industry.

In 2007 he signed a legally binding document dictating that none of the family members or generations to come are to sell part of or the entire John Paul Mitchell Systems Company for 360 years, ensuring that the products will always remain professional and will stay where they started, with the Mitchell and DeJoria families.

John Paul DeJoria’s rags-to-riches story exemplifies the American dream - once homeless, he struggled against the odds to achieve success, launching three global enterprises and paying it forward, living by his motto, “Success Unshared is Failure.”  With just $700 he started John Paul Mitchell Systems, converting it into the largest privately held salon hair care line, and later turned a passion into success by co-founding Patrón, the world’s number one ultra-premium tequila. A longtime activist for sustainable business practices and corporate responsibility, John Paul makes these practices paramount as he continues to evolve and grow his businesses, and inspire others.

Click here to register for the event.

Curly Hair Artistry Symposium

by CurlStylist on Monday, September 30th, 2013

Hair Stylists across the country & Europe are looking for advanced curly hair education to help them understand the “how to” of cutting with style and design concepts, and how to teach their natural curly clients an individualized routine they can do at home.
Getting his license in 1986 and having curly hair, Scott Musgrave, owner of Scott Musgrave Hair in Cary, N.C., has been working with curls all his life. Training was very limited and it was in the year 2000 that Scott was inspired by reading the first edition of Curly Girl the Handbook by Lorraine Massey that ignited Scott’s passion for what others are born with and began focusing his journey to be exclusive in building up his curly hair business.
Scott began reading, researching and experimenting the ins and outs of what has worked for other stylists and from his own clients. One mandatory step was to get training from what is known as The Deva Method and in 2011 he became a DEVA Inspired trained stylist. Scott always tells other stylists that, “This training will instill a significant understanding of products, ingredients and curl care through their cutting method and getting rid of frizz through their excellent product line.”
Knowing that each head of curly hair requires a unique blend of products, application techniques and cutting methods, he continued experimenting and expanded his reach for curly hair products with bringing another curl line into his care for curls with a brand called Jessicurl. Scott says, “Jessicurl was developed over 10 years ago through a passion for wanting a product that was made in the kitchen with ingredients not found in products back then.”
Over the past 2 years, Scott has worked hard by listening to the demand of curly hair people all over the world and is expanding the vision of what is possible with curly hair by creating a curl cutting method called The Cubist Curl Cut and a product application method that helps to get rid of frizz that he calls The “MAP”.
Also during this time Scott went online with a website at www.scottmusgravehair.com and was posting tips and guidance on Facebook and a blog called MagiCurl (found on Scott’s website) that other stylists were inquiring about product usage, cutting methods and building their own business based on what Scott was achieving. This lead to developing a private group of hair stylists that have a passion for working with curls and as the group has grown with members all over the world and the methods discussed worked and helped others to achieve their vision, it was a natural progression to have our first event of advanced curl education.

Curly Hair Art Symposium

October 19 -21, 2013, in Atlanta, Georgia, he will host, along with Robin Sjoblom, the first Curly Hair Artistry Symposium for licensed hair professionals who will be attending from all over the USA and Canada. Stylists will contribute their own experience with each other and special guest curly hair artists will present information based on their own passion and methods of working with curly hair. We will even celebrate with having a toast for the author of Curly Girl the Handbook Lorraine Massey.
The event is sold out, and with talks of more to come, we have hope in knowing that curly hair as an art form is alive and well because stylists are growing with excitement to gain more curly hair knowledge and to expand our small niche arena through education. Also, what is more exciting is knowing that the clients are learning about this and are just as passionate in knowing that their hair will be treated the way it should be treated.

Behind the Cover with Stacy Hill

by CurlStylist on Wednesday, September 18th, 2013

Curl stylist Stacy Hill was the brilliant stylist behind the latest Texture! cover, and we had the pleasure of interviewing her about her work, her inspiration, and her favorite trends!

CurlStylist: Congratulations on your cover! The first thing we noticed is that you featured several different textures on one woman’s head - just like in real life! How do you recommend stylists and curly haired women work with the multiple textures?

Stacy Hill:I recommend learning to work with each texture instead of working against them. Know that you may have to use more that one product, especially if some of your curls are extremely loose while others are tightly coiled. You may also have to try multiple methods, like twisting the front top portion of your hair if it has “gone straight” from constant smoothing and brushing. Embrace each pattern and learn to love your hair.  Be confident in styling your hair and get creative.  Don’t be afraid to create new trends.

CS: How do you take high fashion styles from runways or magazine covers and interpret them as wearable looks for curlies?

SH: We use magazines for inspiration only. There are so many fierce high fashion styles, but the reality is they’re not very practical or wearable for everyday life. For our photo shoots, there are no limits; but for day to day, we rework those looks and tone them down. For example, we may use more of the client’s natural hair and less extensions for a more natural look; or we may use less stuffing in our bouffants and chignons so that they’re not as big and heavy. We also push ourselves to innovate and create styles that we haven’t seen in the industry or in editorial. We always want to be a few steps ahead so clients will look to us for something different.

CS: What was the inspiration behind your Modern Day Princess cover? What is a Modern Day Princess to you?

SH: Our awesome makeup artist, Whitney Norris, came up with the idea of Modern Day Princess. Our whole brand promotes self-empowerment and knowing that you are beautiful, so the concept made perfect sense. The cover style was done by one my talented stylists Brittany Adams, and the photos on pages 24-28  were a collaboration of the entire style team. A Modern Day Princess is strong, confident and unapologetic for being fabulous. She’s not perfect, but she sincerely tries to utilize all of her strengths to be the best version of herself that she can be! She’s supportive and empowering to others and wise in knowing that they’re sparkle brightens her crown.

CS: Any tips for women who want to recreate your cool bouffant look?

SH: To recreate the look simply allow natural curls to dry after applying the proper curl enhancing product.   If your hair isn’t long or full enough you may need extra textured hair to add as a stuffing. Slightly tease the top of the hair, shape your bouffant with the teased hair, and secure it with bobby pins. Remember to keep the texture in tact.  The sides of the bouffant can be smoothed more or less, depending on how dramatic you want the look to be. For the back of the hair,” DyeVerCity Glam Extensions” were added and tightly wanded on a pencil size curling wand.  Once extensions were in place, the curls were picked apart to match the model’s natural wave pattern, while still adding a slight contrast.

CS: What products did you use to create the look?

SH: First,My Honey Child Aloe Vera Leave In was applied to the hair all over.
PUR Whip Hair Jelly by Afroveda to define the curl.  Syntonics edge define to smooth edges in place.  Design Essential spritz to hold hair in place.

CS: What’s your favorite trend in texture right now?

SH: I love big, curly textured hair with pops of color.  The awesome thing about texture is there are no rules for styling.  You can get so creative and create so many different styles.  Check out pages 24-28 and that will show some of the DyeVerCity of beautiful textured hair.

NAHA Celebrates 24 Years

by CurlStylist on Monday, May 6th, 2013

The Professional Beauty Association Announces Finalists for the 2013 North American Hairstyling Awards (NAHA)

NAHA Celebrates 24 Years as the Top Honor for the Professional Beauty Industry

Sunday, July 14, 2013 | Mandalay Bay Resort | Las Vegas, Nevada

Phoenix, AZ (April 30, 2013) - The Professional Beauty Association (PBA) announces the much anticipated finalists for the 2013 North American Hairstyling Awards (NAHA). As the most prestigious photographic beauty competition in North America, NAHA celebrates the artistry and skill of the professional salon industry.  As the pinnacle achievement for professional hairstylists and makeup artists, past and present NAHA entrants, finalists and winners continue to push the boundaries of trend-setting style. Drawing from leading editorial, celebrity, and platform artists whose work graces top fashion and beauty magazines, runway shows, and red-carpets, NAHA is the culmination of style, beauty trends and sheer artistry.

NAHAs are given in 14 distinct categories including Avant Garde, Contemporary Classic, Editorial Stylist of the Year, Haircolor, Make-Up Artist of the Year, Master Hairstylist of the Year, Newcomer Stylist of the Year, Salon Design, Salon MBA, Salon Team, Student Hairstylist of the Year, Texture, and all new for 2013, Men’s Hairstylist of the Year.  The highest honor is the coveted award for Hairstylist of the Year.

The 2013 NAHA Awards Ceremony is open to ALL and will be held on Sunday, July 14, 2013 at the Mandalay Bay Resort in Las Vegas. An evening filled with high-energy, creative expression and artistic presentations by Aveda, KAO/Goldwell and Dimitrios Tsioumas, recipient of the 2012 Hairstylist of the Year NAHA.

NAHA continues to draw from a diverse and internationally renowned list of hairstylists and makeup artists from the United States, Canada, Great Britain, Australia, and Switzerland. Judges included Vivienne Mackinder, 5-time NAHA award winner, founder ofHairDesignerTV.com, and editor-in-chief of MOD magazine; Tabatha Coffey, author, stylist and host of Bravo’s Tabatha’s Salon Takeover; Nicholas French, renowned UK stylist, author, and speaker; and Damien Carney, prominent beauty industry educator, founder of hairstyling academy Damien Carney London, and NAHA finalist along with many other top hairstylists from around the world! Via a blind judging process, entries were narrowed down to five finalists per category, and only one winner in each category will be chosen.

To see the work of all the NAHA finalists and to learn more about the NAHA Awards Ceremony in Las Vegas on Sunday, July 14, 2013, visit probeauty.org/naha.

Interview with Paul Mitchell Educator LaDonna Dryer

by Michelle Breyer on Friday, November 2nd, 2012

Paul Mitchell educator LaDonna Dryer knows a little about working with coilier hair textures. She’s a 4c herself, and her Savannah, Ga. salon, he Said…she Said Salon in Savannah, Ga., has a large clientele of women who have transitioned from relaxers to natural hair. So she brought a unique perspective to “The Truth About Curls” campaign to launch the Paul Mitchell Curls line.

LaDonna believes it’s an exciting time for natural women.

“I see a lot of people making the transition,” says Dryer, who transitioned herself. “I didn’t think I would be natural. I cut it really short and wondered what would happen if I never put a relaxer in again.”

These days, Dryer fully embraces her natural hair, wearing it in a 2-strand twist one day or an afro puff the next.

NaturallyCurly’s own Michelle Breyer asked Dryer to provide her top tips for natural women.

Michelle Breyer: What are some of your top tips to help women who are transitioning?

LaDonna Dryer: One of the biggest challenges when you go natural is to retain the moisture in your hair. Using sulfate-free shampoos is key. They help a lot in terms of keeping the cuticle calm and retaining that moisture. I really like the new Paul Mitchell Curls Spring Loaded Shampoo, which is ultra moisturizing and sulfate free.

The second most important thing is to condition. There are different kinds of moisturizing conditioners, and one size doesn’t fit all. Even baby fine hair may need some type of moisture, but maybe not something as heavy as you’d use on tight coils. I like that Paul Mitchell offers several moisturizing conditioners to choose from. There’s The Rinse, a light conditioner designed to deposit moisture where it’s needed; the Tea Trea Lavender Mint Conditioner, a heavier conditioner; and the Super-Charged Moisturizer, an intense hydrating treatment. You have to find the right moisturizing plan for your hair.

MB: What are some tips for natural hair styles?

LD: Obviously you let it be free. We do something in the salon called the Mo ‘Fro (Modern ‘Fro). Other options are 2-strand twists and coils. When people come into the salon and want something more intricate, I may do a 2-strand twist or coils in the salon, but I show them how they can do it themselves at home.

I like to use Paul Mitchell Full Circle Leave-In Treatment to soften up the hair, and sometimes I’ll use it as a styling product. For coarser textures with a tighter curl, I may use the Paul Mitchell Curl Ultimate Wave to get some stretch. If I don’t want to manipulate the curl and just want to enhance what’s there, I use the Twirl Around Crunch-Free Curl Definer.

Another one of my secrets is to use the Paul Mitchell Awapuhi Styling Treatment Oil to prep the hair. It gives a good sheen to the hair without making it too heavy.

Other good options for added definition are Paul Mitchell Foaming Pommade and Paul Mitchell Super Sculpt. I find that I can use a lot of Foaming Pommade — about an ounce all over the head. Let it air dry, and you get a nice defined curl.

MB: What other options do you offer for clients transitioning to natural hair?

LD: Blowouts are still big. The client may like the look of relaxers but they don’t want to use chemicals. But I do warn them if you use a flat iron or blowdryer all the time, you will lose your curl pattern. It doesn’t always take a chemical to straighten the hair. If you are natural and like your natural curl, you need to take a break from heat styling so your hair doesn’t lose the curly texture it has.

MB: What are your favorite product cocktails?

LD: There’s a difference between cocktailing and layering products. I may prep the hair with the Awapuhi Styling Treatment Oil and then layer the Ultimate Wave and/or Twirl Around on top of it. It depends on the texture, the style and the degree of dryness.

One guest could come in with extremely dry hair and it’s necessary to cocktail with more shine-inducing and moisture-inducing products. I’ll put her on a treatment program, with regular deep conditioning. The more I do that, the less I need to cocktail styling products.

MB: There are some people with coilier hair textures who wonder whether the new Paul Mitchell products are made for their hair?

LD: I think there are a lot of misconceptions that it’s not for type 4s. I have to admit that before I came to the company, I wondered whether they had products that would work for my type 4c hair. Education opened up my eyes to what Paul Mitchell products can do for hair like mine. Paul Mitchell has had products for a long time that work well for my hair. I think the new Paul Mitchell Curl product made it easier for people with all textures to identify with the products.

MB: Any tips on how best to use the new Paul Mitchell Curl products for type 4 hair textures?

LD: You have to properly emulsify the styling products in your hands and work them through the hair.

For my natural looks, I’ll use Full Circle first. I also use Ultimate Wave and occasionally Gloss Drops. Then, I’ll add the Awapuhi Styling Treatment Oil because I like the way it feels.

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