Archive for the ‘Styling’ Category

Is Frizz the New Trend?

by Tracey on Saturday, September 1st, 2012

Just when we’re laser focused on the matter and finally winning the battle against frizz, we glance up to notice something on the horizon.

Oh no, frizz is making a reappearance! But wait. It’s different. It’s—it’s pretty! From the catwalks to the coasts, frizz is seriously trending. In a way, that means textured clients can let out a collective sigh of relief. Frizz is at least the devil they know.

Nature’s Gift

“Curly and wavy hair textures tend to naturally be more frizzy,” says Davin Alan Testerman, artistic style manager at Kenra Professional. “The core bonds of the hair shaft are crooked and, even if healthy, have the tendency to appear frizzy.”

Furthermore, because of the structure of wavy, curly and coily hair, it is harder for the scalp’s natural oils to move down the hair shaft. Less oil means less hydration, and less hydration means more frizz.

“Hair becomes frizzy when it lacks moisture, which can happen from styling methods, chemical services or natural occurrence,” says Jaritza Ortiz, education and testing coordinator at GK Hair. “When there is high humidity in the air, hair tends to pull in needed moisture, thereby causing frizz.”

Frizz as Fashion

Accepting their frizzy fate, curlies have learned to live with it or conquer it, but they haven’t glorified it in decades. This was one pendulum that was rarely predicted to swing back. But pendulums always do.

“Frizz is becoming more of a trend on the runway because, quite simply, it’s time,” says Testerman. “The looks on the silver screen, runways and magazine covers have been straight for so long that the avant-garde direction that sashays down the runway should seem to go to the extreme of curly-frizzy.”

Houston salon owner Efrain Leiva, an educator and international platform artist for Farouk, agrees. “This look is coming because the younger generation hasn’t tried it yet,” he observes.

“Now that they’re seeing it, they’ll want to try it.”

And they’ll be seeing more of it, says Ortiz, who notes that hair silhouettes always balance clothing design. “Runway fashion for this fall is showing military chic, with sleek lines and olive green and brass, along with the laminated look,”she adds. “Those masculine styles and hard finishes are complemented by a softer, frizzy, romantic style.”

On Main Street, Leiva sees the trend more as evolution than revolution.

“Right now only the trendiest clients are asking for frizz,” he says. “In New York and L.A., there are women from all over the world, so clients are more exposed to international looks, but here in Houston we’re not seeing a lot of it. However, our clients are getting into wavy hair. Before we get them into frizzy hair, we have to move them into a nice wave — a softer look — and after that it will slowly happen.”

That was Then

Perhaps salon clients have to first trust that this is not their mother’s — or grandmother’s—frizz.

“The last time we had the chance to see a true shift from sleek-straight trends was the transition from Cher’s parted-down the-middle ’70s ’do to the over-processed and big hair of the ’80s,” says Testerman. While overprocessing may have been an appropriate vehicle at the time, it won’t fly today. But neither will the opposite — just letting hair have its way.

“In the ’80s, most of the frizz was natural,” says Leiva. “Today we make it happen with products, tools and even color techniques.”

Frizz-seeking clients will replace smoothing shampoos and conditioners with hydrating products. Instead of flat irons and curling irons, the heat tool of choice will be the blow dryer. And rather than drenching the hair in styling creams, they will rough up the cuticle with pomades and polishes.

“I love to see frizzy hair with shine in it,” Leiva says. “Use some spray to hold it, so it looks as though it’s been styled and didn’t just happen. This time around, we’re creating manageable frizz.”

Good Frizz / Bad Frizz

Frizz is already a big staple in current hair fashion. You know the messy French twist, braid, chignon or loose pony? Yep, the unfinished part—the coolest part—is frizz. But it’s good frizz.

“Good frizz is something we stylists call ‘flyaway hair,’” says Matrix Artistic Director Daniel Roldan, a hair stylist at NYC’s Cutler Salon and a finalist in the NAHA 2011 texture category. “When you have good frizz, the hair is light and airy. Bad frizz, on the other hand, is overworked and over-dry hair with no control.”

To create good frizz, first dry the hair thoroughly and apply product throughout the hair, Roldan advises.

“You can use a variety of tools,” he continues, naming a teasing comb, cushion brush and wig brush. “Once you have control of the hair’s direction, you can go against the grain to create the frizz.”

Farouk Educator and International Platform Artist Efrain Leiva uses the air from the blow dryer to do the backcombing for him.

“Hold the hair with the brush and apply some tension,” he directs. “Then to rough-up the hair, blow-dry toward the scalp — against the natural pattern.”

While color services have a purpose beyond that of frizzmaker, they can be worked to that added advantage. Leiva employs blonding baliage techniques to tease out the frizz.

“We place lighter color on the ends, and then we don’t style them,” he explains. “Very blonde color helps the hair on the ends become frizzy. These unfinished looks are very in style.”

The professionals at Global Keratin Hair offer this recipe for healthy, haute frizz:

1. Prep the hair by mixing a cocktail of GK Hair’s Curl Define Her and Leave In Cream.

2. Either let the hair dry naturally or gently use a diffuser.

3. Divide the hair into four sections, and grab chunks of about one inch each. Taking each chunk, do a few wraps with your index finger.

4. Holding the wrap gently between your thumb and index finger, push back with the thumb and index finger of your other hand. This will create a beautifully textured, curly, controlled frizz look.

5. Finish with the GK Hair Light Hold Hairspray.

From Kenra Professional come these tips:

1. After moisturizing the hair, use a curl-enhancing product such as Kenra Classic’s Curl Glaze Mousse 13, Curl Defining Creme 5 or Curl Spray 8. Choose the product most appropriate for the client’s hair type.

2. Diffuse the hair to maximize volume and promote lustrous curl.

3. After hair is dry, turn the head upside down, lightly mist an aerosol working spray and gently fluff and separate existing curl.

4. Flip hair back over and reapply a working spray such as Kenra Classic’s Design Spray 9 or Perfect Medium Spray 13.

5. For any desired curl formations that need to be touched up or enhanced with a small curling iron, spray Kenra Classic’s Thermal Styling Spray 19.

Texture Watch: Oprah, Wow Wands and Textured Men

by Modern Salon on Saturday, September 1st, 2012

Picture Perfect Volume

“For the first time ever, Oprah’s appearing on the September cover of O without blow-drying or straightening her hair,” announced the Oprah empire on the website of O Magazine, in which each issue features its founder as the covergirl. “She says that wearing her hair naturally as she often does on weekends and on vacation makes her feel unencumbered.”

Not new to the makeover method of reenergizing your self-image, Oprah says that all makeovers are not created equal. The best, according to her statement, are those that resonate with how you already think and feel about yourself. “The only way to real transformation is through the mind,” says the queen of self-actualization.

While Oprah’s ‘do is au naturale except for, from our eye, an expertly blended product cocktail another September magazine cover display of afro-esque hair cannot boast the same. Lady Gaga lands atop this month’s Vogue brightened by a platinum halo of hair designed by celeb stylist Grace Coddington. While the haute-texture look suits her, this is one time the Lady cannot claim she was “born this way.”

Wow Wands

In the old days, the last thing a curly-haired client needed in her tool drawer was a curling iron. New days are here! Specialty curling irons represent the hottest trend for curlies looking for an easy way to shape coil chaos into orderly fabulosity.

Among the new irons hitting the marketplace is the Bio Ionic StyleWinder with a rotating barrel that eliminates the need to turn the iron over and over. Instead, a “clamp, wrap and roll” maneuver ends wrist strain while creating perfect curls, waves and spirals.

Another recent entry into the category, the CHI Interchangeable 3 in 1 Digital Orbit, offers a clamp-free barrel to permit curls to wrap and then glide off with no snagging or styling interruption.

The Textured Man

Height is happening! With male manes growing fuller this season, texturizing products and cutting techniques are a good bet for impressing your guy clients. Show them how to mix hair product cocktails to customize their look with anything from a light touch to a mighty mountain of texture.

Survey Says

New research indicates that curly clients are loving their texture and hungry to keep the conversation going.

Did you know that 65 percent of people with wavy hair straighten it at least sometimes? But that key word wavy means just what it says. Be careful not to apply wavy-haired habits to those of kinky-curly clients, more than half of whom choose to go “natural” all of the time.

“You cannot look at all textured clients as one category,” cautions Michelle Breyer, president of TextureMediaInc. “There are different needs and desires depending on their texture, because not all texture is created equal! If you want to be a well-rounded texture stylist, you must understand that there’s more than one type of texture client.”

Recent research also indicates that texture clients are continually looking for new options. Nearly half of curly clients who are happy with their product of choice still have an eye out for the next great development. That nonstop interest in their texture keeps the conversation open for you to introduce them to new products and tools even after you’ve “solved” their hair issues. The two major reasons texture clients believe that people are more accepting of their curls today vs. five years ago are that stylists and products are increasingly addressing their needs, and that people are more appreciative of their own natural beauty.

Perhaps the best news from the market research department is that a small minority (only two percent) of textured clients say they wish they had straight hair. Today’s clients either fully embrace their curl or admit to good days and bad days. As you become more fully educated about texture and skilled at styling it, you’ll help make every day a day that your curly clients are grateful for the beautiful texture that nature provided.

Texture Live!

For training in curly hairdressing as well as more information on smoothing techniques, mark your calendar for March 3-5, 2013, when America’s Beauty Show will feature exciting main stage presentations of Texture Live!, sponsored by MODERN SALON and TextureMediaInc.com. Watch demonstrations of the latest products and most advanced techniques to arm yourself with expertise to become the go-to professional for textured clients.

Curls and Water Do Mix!

On a Saturday in June during Premiere Orlando, hundreds of curlies and stylists from all over the Southeast flocked to the pool at the Omni Hotel and Resort in Orlando for an afternoon of pool-tastic, curl-centric fun at the 2nd Annual Curly Pool Party. The formal pool was transformed into a colorful and luxuriant afternoon soiree filled with swimming, styling demonstrations and pina ”curladas.”

Sponsored by TextureMedia and Modern Salon Media, the curl celebration showcased such brands as Ouidad and Amika, which each set up shop in their own private cabanas to teach people how to work with their clients’ texture and their own!

“It’s so hard to deal with my curls in this humidity,” lamented one attendee who drove in from Tampa. “I never know how to protect them when I go swimming. But after coming here, I’m ready for summer! Bring on the water and the heat!”

Education

Learn how to manage unruly locks with these texture-specific classes that will keep you up-to- date on techniques to tame tame and control your clients’ curls for months.

LOOK AND LEARN

This two-hour program is conducted by a Simply Smooth texture manager who will demonstrate the Simply Smooth keratin and maintenance line on a mannequin. Attendees observe the process of application, drying and curing with Simply Smooth Keratin (original), Xtend Color Lock and Touch of Keratin, with opportunity for Q & A.

Attendees will learn the art of texture management and how to increase revenue with all of Simply Smooth’s keratin products. The company also offers three-hour sessions to achieve Simply Smooth certification.

Where: CosmoProf and Armstrong-McCall stores in U.S. cities.

When: Various Mondays. Contact your sales rep.

CHI ENVIRO AMERICAN SMOOTHING CLASS

As a safe alternative to traditional, harsh straightening treatments, the CHI Enviro American Smoothing Treatment infuses hair with amino acids, proteins, silk and pearl. The process improves the condition, shine and smoothness of unruly hair. Results typically last up to four months.

Where: Armstrong-McCall, 1540 Keller Pkwy., Keller, Texas.

When: September 9, 9am-5pm

Purchase of some specially marked CHI items earns salons the opportunity to hold this class free as an in-salon class.

GK EXPERIENCE

The GK Experience covers GK Hair’s Oil Hair Color and The Best Juvexin Treatment & Hair Taming Systems. Stay on in Florida and attend the two-day GK Hair Collection Cutting class the following week.

Where: Dania Beach, Florida at the Sheraton (GK Experience) and at Hyatt Place (Collection Cutting)

When: September 17, 9am-1pm (GK Experience), and September 24-25, 10am-5pm (Collection Cutting)

Be the first to hear the buzz about texture on the runway! Follow ModernSalon.com and NaturallyCurly.com for complete curly coverage of New York Fashion Week the second week of September, previewing next spring’s hottest runway looks.

Wash and Go Styling Tips

by Claire Aviles on Tuesday, July 17th, 2012

With this summer’s hot and humid weather, naturalistas everywhere are seeking simple styles that keep them cool and their coils looking healthy.

Here are some tips from Design Essentials Master Educators Deshonica Kerrie and Francesca Adams. They will help anyone achieve the right conditions for cool, funky wash and go styling.

Wash and Go Shampooing Basics

Always detangle from ends to root before shampooing to release the coils and make the shampoo process easier.

Detangle with either Design Essentials HCO Leave-In Conditioner or Hydrate Leave-In Hydrating Conditioner before shampooing.

If you experience knotting at the ends of the hair when trying to detangle, use a cream-based conditioner and use your fingers to loosen the knots before shampooing.

Remove hair build-up without stripping the hair by shampooing with Design Essentials Organic Cleanse Deep Conditioning Shampoo, followed by the sulfate-free Design Essentials Natural Curl Cleanser Shampoo.

Wash and Go Conditioning Basics
One of the challenges with wash and go hair is quickly styling before seeing frizz or shrinkage. Here are some tips to ensure adequate moisture and ample time to style.

Use a hydrating leave-in conditioner, such as Design Essentials Natural Moisturizing Conditioner, for achieving more volume along with a daily moisturizing agent, such as Design Essentials Natural Daily Moisturizing Lotion, for achieving more definition as a base before using a curl enhancing product such as Design Essentials.

With these tips you can achieve a fabulous wash and go style that clients will step out of the salon raving about!

Paul Mitchell’s Robert Cromeans Talks Curl Styling

by Cassadie on Monday, July 16th, 2012

The CurlStylist team is here in Las Vegas for the annual Paul Mitchell Gathering where the world-renowned product line and school is launching a new product and education initiative focused on CURLS. Our West Coast Correspondent Cassidy Blackwell sat down to chat with the one-and-only Robert Cromeans about trends and techniques in texture!

4 Tips For The Perfect Blow-Out

by Alicia Ward on Tuesday, June 26th, 2012

Lady with curly hair style

Curly hair is beautiful in its natural state. As stylists, we love to see women embrace their natural curls, coils and waves. However, we know that everyone likes options and variety. No one person can eat the same lunch everyday for their entire life just like no one curly can wear her hair the same her whole life. Blow-outs are a great way to help your clients change up their look. Here are four tips to help you give your client the perfect blow out.

1. Start Clean and Detangled!

You should always start fresh and clean for a smooth blowout. When selecting a cleanser, pick one that has smoothing properties like Matrix Total Results Sleek Shampoo. Choose a conditioner that is very moisturizing and has smoothing and de-frizzing qualities. We recommend the pair to the above shampoo, Matrix Total Results Sleek Conditioner. You will need to do a thorough job of wide-tooth comb detangling before you get started to ensure you get every curl smooth. Before you detangle be sure to apply a leave-in conditioner. Again, when selecting products for a blow out, choose products that have a smoothing properties like Matrix Total Results Moisture Cure 2-Phase Leave-In Treatment. Hair should be damp but not dripping wet when you get started. Remember to use a microfiber towel to gently dry your curls before starting, because this will help reduce frizz and friction.

2. Protect and Separate!

To ensure that your curls are protected from heat damage, apply a heat protectant and smoother. Matrix Total Results Sleek Iron Smoother works to protect and smooth curls for heat styling. To apply this heat protectant place a dime to quarter size into your hand and distribute it evenly.  Then, separate curls into sections, this will make the drying more manageable and reduce tangles.

3. Dry: Hot and Cold!

Now it’s time to start drying the hair in sections. Grab the first section and start drying it at the top, aiming the blow dryer downward and moving it from the top of the hair to the ends. Alternate between hot and cold settings on the blow dryer. It’s best to use a round brush and a dryer with a concentrator nozzle. These are must have tools for a good blow out. Using high heat and a concentrator nozzle to direct the dryer’s airflow, dry hair from root to tip for about 8 seconds, then lock out the frizz by using the cool shot button for 5 seconds. If the hair is excessively curly or coily, start by drying hair from mid-shaft to end to minimize styling time.

4. Stop the Frizz!

When you are done drying, to continue to lock out the frizz, dab a pea-sized amount of smoothing oil onto your hands and smooth it into the ends of the hair to define and separate your tresses. Matrix Total Results Silk Wonder Smoothing Oil will smooth frizz and flyaways. Finish the look by applying Matrix Total Results Amplify Volume Flexible Hold Hairspray, a light hold flexible hairspray that will really lock out the frizz.

Help your clients get your their curls back after their blow out. Deep condition with Matrix Total Results Color Care Intensive Mask to get your client’s moisture and definition back.

[THE CONTEST IS NOW CLOSED]

Win Big!

Matrix is offering you the opportunity to show off you best blow out!

Matrix Curly Girl is challenging six salons to throw down their best blow-out techniques to see whose smooth style reigns supreme. Vote by June 30th, for the salon you think will give our Curly Girl the best & longest lasting blow-out. If your salon wins you will be entered to win one of 50 gift baskets filled with the products the winning salon used on our Curly Girl (a $100 value)! Stylists can involved and enter here.

Premiere Orlando 2012 Trend Watch: Multi-Textured Hair

by Cassadie on Monday, June 11th, 2012

Multi Texture at Premiere Orlando

Inspired by 1950’s Hollywood glamour, multi-textured hair showed prominently on the Premiere Orlando show floor. Rather than creating evenly distributed texture throughout the look, the multi-textured hair we were seeing combined sleek and straight roots that flow into a burst of curls, coils and waves! The best part of this look is that it can be created on any hair textured, whether curly, wavy or straight. Ouidad Creative Director Morgan Willhite explains how to get the this sexy and fun vintage look with a modern twist

For Naturally Textured Hair

Start with very wet hair. Apply Ouidad’s Climate Control Gel thoroughly from roots to ends. Using a fine tooth comb, section in your desired part and begin combing hair in a downward motion smoothing your hair flat till you reaching top of your ears (the halfway point between the top of your head and the nape of your neck).

Using a metal duckbill clip (or any flat length clip) placing clips one after another, securing hair flat from ear to ear. With the top secured smooth, allow to dry natural or use a dryer on low pressure to ensure the hair dries sleek and straight.

On the remainder the hair (from ears down), again rake Ouidad’s Climate Control Gel throughout the curls adding definition. Using a diffuser, dry the bottom curls on high heat, high pressure.

Lifting the diffuser to the scalp, dry curls until completely dry to achieve full, tousled, voluminous curls. Do not diffuse for perfection. The vision of this style is more of a unkept bed head look. Skip the bang if the hair is naturally curly.

Multi Texture at Premiere Orlando

For Naturally Straight Hair

Start with dry hair. For the top area, use a smoothing serum, try Ouidad’s Shine Serum. Using a drop of serum, smooth hair with a fine tooth comb ensuring all those little flyaway are tamed. Also if you have them, bangs are great touch to add a little extra edge to the style.

Again, secure using duckbill clips from ear to ear ensuring to top stays smooth. The bottom area can either be set with rollers or set with a curling iron.

The key for this look is to avoid perfected curls. Break up the curls using a fine tooth comb by teasing with a setting aerosol hairspray. Go throughout the curls and strategically tease the curls adding uneven texture.

Multi Texture at Premiere Orlando

Premiere Orlando 2012: TIGI’s Magazine Curls

by Cassadie on Monday, June 11th, 2012

Dominico Tomei of TIGI

Over on the TIGI stage, platform artist Dominico Tomei of Fernando Cellini salon in Ottawa, was demonstrating not just how to get perfect curls, but rather how to get curls worthy of a magazine spread. Rather than focusing on perfectly formed, frizz-free ringlets Tomei created an ethereal halo that relied on intentionally separated curls for a light and airy final look.

Dominico Tomei of TIGI

Beginning with a basic shape, Tomei first formed the curls using a leave in and serum before completely drying with a diffuser. Once completely dry, Tomei used his fingers to gently pull apart individual sections. In an effort to really take the look to the next level to create what he described as “Editorial Curls,” he pinched a section at the end of the strand and used two fingers on his other hand to slide the hair towards the roots creating drama and lift. Using dry shampoo to create more volume, Tomei’s final look provided gorgeous texture with soft definition and a lot of movement.

Dominico Tomei of TIGI

“I love when a woman has the confidence to wear her natural curls,” said Tomei, “It’s actually really hard for a lot of women to do because they’ve had to hide it their whole lives.”

Experts Predict Hot Curly Hair Trends for 2012

by CurlStylist on Wednesday, February 1st, 2012

It’s a new year, and the style spotlight is on textured hair. Top texture experts share their predictions on what will be this year’s hottest curly hair trends.

Brian and Sandra Smith

Matrix Artistic Directors

This year is defined by minimalism and natural beauty. We see easy elegance for spring in polished ponytails, graceful braids and bouncy blowouts. Still, nothing is too perfect or impeccable —deconstructed waves and undone knots and twists prove having a bit of an edge is as chic as ever.

“You can see it in TV ads and most facets of popular culture: Natural hair is becoming the must-have style for many women. More and more women with texture are turning away from relaxers and extensions to prevent damage and breakage. Now there’s a different kind of shift underway—keeping your hair in its natural state and manipulating and refining texture with product, tools and techniques.”

Kevin Murphy

Editorial Stylist and Founder of Kevin.Murphy Products

“The 1970s wave — think Janis Joplin/mermaid waves. The undone look is a simple idea, but not as easy to achieve as one would think. Texture is one thing and frizz is another and they should not be confused. Frizz is a hard pill to swallow for most women, but to make hair modern, clients need to let go a bit.

“The Afro set will be another trend. This is a method of using a large pin and wrapping the hair around in a figure-eight pattern. This look is great for achieving lots of volume—it’s about embracing texture and going wild. It has a lot to do with freedom and rounder shapes in hair cuts, lots of layers and a shorter length to make a sort of mini fro.”

Cyntelia Abrams

Marketing Coordinator for Design Essentials

“Big, messy curls, waves, twist sets and braid outs—I love hair that is purposely messy with some frizz and wildness to it. Even if you’re natural, I’m an advocate for trims and texture with shape.”

Anthony Dickey

Founder of Hair Rules

“Growing it out and chopping it off! Once women have embraced their natural waves, curls and kinks, many are opting for dynamic, short styles that showcase their unique textures.” “Protective styling is on the upswing, with clients looking for styles that last longer. Many clients with kinkier textures are requesting more braids and twists; and curlier clients are getting more blow outs and looking for more enduring styles they can maintain effortlessly at home.”

Christo

Owner of Christo Fifth Avenue

“Long curls—fringe is outdated for long hair this season. The hair cut trend will be long, diagonal layers that give lift and a lot of movement for a sexy, airy look. It’s very versatile and can be carried off by all hair textures.

“For medium curls, the trend will be one length with very few layers in the front (preferably done with a single-plate sharp shears for more texture). Fringe is welcome with medium lengths to create a sexier look; however, make sure the curls are not tight. This is one of my favorite styles because it can be worn either curly or straight.

“For short curls I suggest the crop. It is super short with long, full bangs and diagonal layers toward the face. This style is for women with loose curls.”

Roni Griffin

Director of Marketing and Business Development for Universal Beauty Products

“Some of the biggest trends will be natural hair colors using non-ammonia based color and bigger styles. People with textured hair will be more comfortable rocking bolder styles due to natural hair becoming more accepted worldwide.”

Jonathan Torch

Founder of Toronto’s Curly Hair Solutions and the Curly Hair Institute

“Texture is now trending in 2012. It has been a while coming, but now it’s here in full swing. Clients and stylists have embraced what they have, and they have learned how to manage, manipulate and get their curls under control and how to show them at their optimum.”

4 Celebrity Curly Hairstyles for Your Arsenal

by CurlStylist on Wednesday, February 1st, 2012

Women in the spotlight are sporting more texture, and clients can look to them for inspiration. Learn how to create these celebrity curly hairstyles from the stylists who created them.

Annie Ilonzeh

Of “General Hospital” and TV’s “Charlie’s Angels”
Stylist: Rocky Vitelli, platform artist for Farouk

Using Farouk Royal Treatment, prep hair by cleansing with Pure Hydration Shampoo and Farouk Royal Treatment Aqua Charge Conditioner. Add Pearl Complex to wet hair, then blow dry using CHI Ceramic dryer.

Once hair is prepped, take small sections at the nape, horizontally. Spray the hair with Ultimate Control prior to curling for maximum hold. Using the ¾-inch CHI Digital Orbit Iron, curl the hair section by section, working your way to the top of the head. Once curled, pin sections up at the crown to give height and form. To ensure lasting hold, nish with Ultimate Control spray and Rapid Shine for silky, shiny, healthy results.

Corinne Bailey Rae

Singer
Stylist: Ami Mankey of Madusalon in San Francisco

The key to this wash-and-go style is to amplify the natural curl pattern by making sure hair has enough moisture. Don’t completely rinse out conditioner after washing, then trickle some water on to re-wet hair. Before air drying, shake curls loosely. All the conditioner will give a soft, light hold and hair will also be frizz free. For extra pizzazz, scrunch in light-hold styling products on slightly wet hair. For extra volume when hair is dry, put client’s head upside down and rub ngers on the scalp to backcomb the curls with ngers, rather than a comb. This will provide volume without the frizz.

Hayden Panetierre

Actress
Stylist: Ami Mankey of Madusalon in San Francisco

For this easy-to-achieve, elegant updo, apply a light hold styling product after washing and conditioning hair. Let air dry or gently use a diffuser. Once dry, pull back hair into a loose bun. For the piece-y, slick look, gently glide pomade through hair using ngertips. To create the sexy pompadour on top, use the back of a rat tail comb to tease and lift hair from the roots. Finish with a little shine spray for bling and nishing spray for hold.

Jill Scott

R&B singer/actress
Stylist: Felicia Leatherwood, Scott’s personal stylist

Wash and condition the hair, then apply a leave-in conditioner and seal with a serum before blowing out the hair. Section hair with a dramatic angle from front to back, going in an “S” pattern.

Isolate one whole side of hair from the side where the braid pattern will be. Use a small amount of synthetic hair to support the cornrows, so the natural hair is protected. After completing one side of the head with the desired cornrow design, join all of the braids into one continuous braid that follows the S parting down the middle of the head from front to back.

Sew Bohyme human hair on the side of the head with the one continuous braid. Follow the pattern of the braid until the one side is complete, leaving the cornrow designs exposed. Once human-hair sewing has been completed on the one side, cut and shape the Bohyme hair, giving it volume. Finish the style with a luster and shine serum.

Textured Hair on the Runway

by Cassadie on Wednesday, February 1st, 2012

The spotlight is on texture in the fashion industry, and we don’t mean tweeds, wools and ruching. Curls, kinks and waves are front and center on the runway this season.

Sleek, flat locks are a thing of the past on the runway as fashion designers and hair stylists draw inspiration from the textured-hair revolution taking place around the world. Together, they have resurrected the art of the curl and are putting it center stage in fashion shows everywhere.

The versatility of texture provides stylists with an infinite amount of creative possibilities for designing high-drama, high fashion, haute couture hair to complement the equally dramatic clothing created by renowned designers.

“Rather than sleek, straightened hair, what we’re seeing more and more of in fashion is a celebration and enhancement of texture,”says runway and celebrity stylist Danilo.

Consumer Influence

The fashion industry draws its inspiration not only from other cultures and eras, but also from what’s happening on urban streets. Tammy Mixon of Farouk’s Global Artistic Board says she has noticed more consumer awareness of the damaging potential of double processing hair.

“We’re seeing more coloring, and as a result, less straightening treatments, so naturally there has been a reemergence of textured hair,”says Mixon.

Additionally, via websites like NaturallyCurly.com geared toward textured hair, and a wide network of curly-haired bloggers and vloggers, there has also been a large increase in consumer education of how to work with and wear natural texture.

“That’s the beauty of having an educated population: a multi-textured world,” says Anthony Dickey, lead stylist and founder of Hair Rules.

As the number of people wearing naturally textured hair increases, designers are picking up on this global trend and incorporating texture into their runway presentations.

“I think designers are also finding inspiration in models who are unapologetically sporting their natural hair,” says Dickey. “By incorporating naturally existing textures into their runway shows, designers create a more distinctive and authentic presentation to complement their unique aesthetics.”

On the Runway

Textured hair on the runway comes in a wide variety of forms depending on the designer’s overall concept. From loose waves to tightly kinked afros, stylists are exploring all options.

“This year we were seeing a lot of what we call ‘third-day hair,’” says Cutler salon stylist Mike Martinez. “It’s big, loose natural waves that create a sort of undone look.”

Another popular look is created from tighter curls that have been deconstructed for a voluminous look with a lot of movement. “This is a style I want to see more of,” says Mixon. “The bigger the better!”

Frizz has also become a fashion forerunner, according to Danilo: “I love the drama of frizz. It’s got a really playful structure.”

Working with a model’s hair texture, whether it’s frizz or flat, is becoming a popular method for runway stylists. Carlos Fernandez of LuxeLab, who is known for his innovative work in enhancing texture for runway shows, likes to adapt a model’s hair texture to the runway concept.

“If a look is straight with a deep side part, but a model has super kinky hair, I won’t necessarily blow the hair straight, but I will work to enhance the natural texture and incorporate the deep side part. It looks better on the model and is less work for the stylist,” he says.

However, texture isn’t always seen in variations of curls and waves. It’s also seen in the introduction of braids, twists, buns, knots and crimped pieces to the hair.

“Texture is about adding a bit of intrigue to the hair,” says Martinez. “It’s taking the extra step to add a bit of drama where the audience least expects it. That’s where you go from a normal salon style to a runway style.”

Mixon also noted that it’s rare to see a runway show without incorporating extensions into the looks: “Hair has to be exaggerated because it’s on stage,” she says.

Rising to the Challenge

Despite the growing popularity of texture on the runway, there still exists a lack of industry knowledge in working with curls.

“I learned how to work with textured hair because I am passionate about it and pursued working with texture on my own,” says Fashion Week stylist Jennifer Lord of Naturally Me! Salon in Baltimore. “It’s not something taught in cosmetology school.”

Behind the scenes of the Spring 2012 shows in Paris, model Jourdan Dunn tweeted her frustrations with lack of stylist knowledge in working with her texture.

“It’s so surprising to fi nd yourself at a show being styled by a stylist who knows how to work with my hair,” says model Nikia Phoenix.“I refuse to have my hair straightened anymore and I bring my own products because I’ve found I know texture better than most stylists. I keep my hair short because with less hair, there’s less risk of a stylist damaging my hair.”

What’s Next

With advancements in product formulations and tools, stylists are now equipped better than ever to create innovative, high-fashion, high-drama, haute-couture textured hair.

“Today we’re at the intersection of fashion and science,” says Danilo. “We have biological needs that science is helping to bring to the public.”

Because of that, interpretation of the word texture is going to be diverse: glam texture, ethnic texture, natural texture, manufactured texture and more. In the upcoming seasons, a return of vintage styling techniques such as setting, pin curls, plaiting, bouffant and fi nger waves combined with modern innovations in coloring and extensions will be the next wave in runway texture.

“The future is both a return to classic and natural techniques and hightech processes,” says Danilo. “Fashion is an opportunity to create a feeling, a vibe, a spirit.”

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