Archive for the ‘Cutting’ Category

How to Cope With A Bad Curly Haircut

by CurlStylist on Friday, June 13th, 2014

photo Theresa Harrison

Neel Morley is the owner of the first hair salon in Melbourne, Australia that is completely dedicated to curly hair. These are his tips on how to deal with a bad curly haircut. Visit the Neel Loves Curls blog here, and like his salon on Facebook here. You may also book online here.


This is a question is often talked about when a client comes in with their Christmas tree haircut or a curly haircut thats been attacked by a razor!


It’s devastating and when people have searched for a curly hair specialist to help their curl recover.

If you are walking out of a salon with your hair blow-dried straight then you will have no idea what it looks like afterwards when it returns curly. It’s not uncommon for people with curly to go home and re do their hair after a haircut. What other service do you have where you have to re do it?

Some curlies say to their peers, “Try it yourself!”

“Use strong pins to pin sections back to mix it up and change the shape.”

I’ve also heard “Try changing your part line,” or “Style it a different way!”

“Headbands and hair accessories are useful. Add a beanie if you can.”

“Having to artificially curl your hair as it doesn’t do it naturally anymore!”

“Accept the possibility of going shorter for a stronger curly hair shape, better to have it short and styled than a mid-length nightmare.”

I would normally say to to cut it shorter if its been razored or thinning scissors used, as the hair is then beyond repair.

It’s just not salvageable and the curls have been badly deformed this way.I would use the internet to find a curly hair dresser and search online for 3 possible curly/wavy haircuts that may suit to take them to the hairdressers. Going along with 30 photos on your iPad isn’t very clear as to what you are actually looking for!
The only good part about a bad curly haircut is that it may have given you the option of trying something new with your hair which in the past you may not have been open to. You could go back and ask the stylist to re cut it .Sometimes a few snips is all that it actually needs. The most important question for a curly haired person is to know that they are going to cut your hair dry as curly hair springs ups so much once it dries.You should be leaving the salon with your hair dry so that you know exactly what your curly haircut is going to look like.

Forums on curly hair are a great source of information.

Once you know the correct things to say, that will limit bad curly haircuts after all prevention is better than the cure. Most people with curly hair have suffered a bad curly haircut a few times in their life.More people are learning about their curls/waves and are learning to be more direct with what they want. I sometimes feel that I am doing more than what my job is as I am teaching someone to love what nature gave them. Sometimes the worst curly haircut can make you Google to see if there is someone out there that can actually cut curly hair!!!

Haircuts for Curly Hair: Movement, Dimension, and Layers…Oh My!

by CurlStylist on Thursday, March 27th, 2014

haircuts for curly hair

With over 20 years of experience in the professional curly industry, senior stylist Leslie Ellen Abbate has seen trends come and go, especially being located on the popular, upscale 5th Avenue in New York City. Her love of the modern woman’s hair and beauty has taken her far in her career, and clients appreciate it. Leslie Ellen doesn’t only consider herself a stylist, but rather an enhancer of dramatic style and lifestyle changes.

CurlStylist: Introduce yourself.

Leslie Ellen Abbate: I am so passionate about what I do. My focus is to work with the natural beauty of your hair to achieve your desired look. I love and specialize in hair makeovers, which can dramatically change your style. My goal is to make you look stylish and feel beautiful. Every client is so special to me. I would love to show you how hair color and highlights would add dimension to your look.

CurlStylist: How did you enter the curly salon industry?

Leslie Ellen Abbate: I am a curly girl! For years I was saddened by one unfortunate haircut after another. I knew there had to be a better way. I have always been particularly fascinated by the beauty and versatility of curls. Because of these reasons, I have dedicated my styling techniques to fit the individual needs of those with curly hair.

CurlStylist: What inspires you throughout the day?
Leslie Ellen Abbate: I feel blessed and inspired by the love of God everyday. I am humbled and in awe that I can to do what I love and be used as a vessel.
CurlStylist: What are your favorite curly hair cuts or styles?
Leslie Ellen Abbate: My favorite thing to enhance a curly girl is to add some movement and dimension. This is can be achieved buy adding some layers and a bayalage. Curly hair should always have some sort of layering. I love to give some movement and life, back  to the hair. Without layering, it can be flat and triangular. As you elevate and layer the hair, it creates movement and frames the face.

CurlStylist: What are some hair trends you’re seeing in NY?
Leslie Ellen Abbate: Bayalage has been around for a while but has really been taken the spotlight lately. It is a way of highlighting the hair without foils. It is a more natural dimensional look, great to hug the curls and add dimension without it being too light or obvious that you added some lightness.

CurlStylist: What is one thing you wish every curly man or woman knew about their hair?

Leslie Ellen Abbate: Do not disturb the curls. The curls have their families they belong with and once separated they will frizz.

CurlStylist: Where is your shop located and how can we schedule an appointment?
Leslie Ellen Abbate: I am currently renting a space at Capelli D’Oro, a bright, airy salon overlooking the buzz of 5th Avenue, in the Flatiron district, at 123 5th Avenue, New York City. Call me directly for an appointment at 718-926-4050. You will enjoy the ambiance of the salon, with its great welcoming energy.

Essential Tips for Hair Growth

by CurlStylist on Tuesday, March 18th, 2014

Michelle O’Connor is the L’Oreal Mizani designer and Artistic Regional Leader of JCP Salons. She shares tips on hair growth from a professional standpoint– and how to address your client’s concerns next time they ask the daunting question, “Why isn’t my hair growing?”
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As a stylists & educator & creative director for a major salon chain, I’m been on more than one occasion been posed with that question has always been considered an elusive conquest amongst the highly textured set . Why doesn’t my hair grow?
This false illusion that curly to excessively curly women experience first hand is the shrunken halo of hair that appears like it’s never growing, or moving beyond a certain point.Misconception……..or is it ? We all know that curly hair is dry hair. Why you ask ? Well, we all produce natural oil from our scalps, however due to the nature of curls or coils twisting & turning around & around, sometimes even zig zagging, the oil just can’t hold on for the ride. As a result of this, the mid-shaft & ends never receive that natural goodness, leading to dry parched hair. This often times leads to split ends, which later results in breakage. This is what usually draws the conclusion that hair isn’t growing. let’s just put this fact out there. Everyone’s hair grows! Whatever growth happened is usually negated by the breaking at the ends, therefore the hair will not pass that treasured landmark we have on our bodies, affectionately known as the chin , shoulders & oh yeah the Rocky Balboa of landmarks…..#brastraplength!
HELP YOU SAY! I can certainly enlighten you. Here is my 2 cents, if you will. I really want you to pay attention to to what I’m about to lay on you. You’ll wonder where I’ve been all your life. All jokes aside, let’s get to the root of things (no pun, seriously) . We’ll call this the Michelle’s hair growth boot camp essentials.

1. Use shampoos without sulfates. Sulfates dry the hair out leading to even more dryness & you know what I told you about that!
2. Don’t wash excessively. Remember we are in desperate need of moisture. Let’s stick to no more that 2-3 times a week. I highly recommend a co-wash or conditioning wash. This is basically a conditioner with cleansing properties.
3. Deep condition at least once a week. A hooded dryer or a warm towel wrapped around the head will help the conditioner to penetrate the hair deeper. Think about warm water when washing your face. It opens the pores right? Well warmth will open the cuticles in the hair. Get it? Oh yeah, whine your at it , a scalp massage wouldn’t hurt either. It’ll increase the blood flow.
4. Get a protein treatment around once a month, more than that if necessary. This helps restore the strength to the hair. When we color, flat iron , blow dry & do anything that decreases the strength, we have to put back in what we’ve depleted. Kinda like when we go in our savings account. I won’t tell.
5. Use a protective covering over your hair, like a satin bonnet. I know that you’re giving me the side eye right now, but just hear me out. You can also get your sexy on and make it a satin pillow case. You see standard cotton pillow cases absorb moisture out of the hair. Satin will not do that. The hair will slide around on satin & keep all your due diligence intact. Make satin your hair’s new BFF.
6. Moisture, moisture moisture ! That’s my nod to the Brady bunch. Every day before you walk out of the house, grace your tresses with a moisturizing hair dress or essential oil. Steer clear of silicones, petrolatum & mineral oil. You want penetrating oils, not substances that sit on top of your hair.
7. limit your use of heat, and on those occasions, do not forget to use a thermal protector. This includes blow dryers & irons, not hooded dryers or warm towel which are essential to deep conditioning. Daily heat use can contribute to heat damage. Heat damage= poor elasticity. Poor elasticity= weak hair . Weak hair= breakage.
8. Last but not least, get your hair trimmed regularly! YES, don’t wine about it. It’s necessary. Each hair strand is growing at a different interval. There are three stages of hair growth. Anagen (the growth phase) approximately 85% of all hairs are in the growing phase at any one time. This stage can last from 2-6 years. Then there is Catagen (the transitional phase). This stage lasts for about two weeks & the hair follicle shrinks to about 1/6 of its normal  length. Lastly there is Telogen (the resting phase). 10-15% of hairs are in this phase. During this time of 5-6 weeks the hair doesn’t grow, but it stays attached to the follicle. At the end of Telogen the hair follicle re-enters the Anagen phase. If the old hair has not already shed, the new hair pushes the old one out and the growth cycle starts all over again. Sorry I had to get all scientific on you, but I just wanted you to understand that trimming the hair is essential, because at any stage, the thousands of stands of hair on your head are going through different phases. The more uniform you keep those ends the stronger your hair will be. It’s like when you see a person with long hair & only 3 strands of it are long . One wrong move with a hairbrush & it’s a wrap! Don’t do it! . Don’t be that girl! In the hair world, there is strength in numbers.

In closing I have one thing to chant …..Rocky, Rocky, Rocky!

10 Mistakes Stylists Make When Cutting Curlies

by CurlStylist on Monday, March 4th, 2013

When we asked curly clients for their horror cut-and-blow dry stories, we got an earful!

1. Thinned the hair/used a razor.

2. Gave a blunt cut.

3. Didn’t use a diffuser.

4. Ran fingers through the hair during the blow dry.

5. Dried the head upside down.

6. Cut the hair wet.

7. Cut too much; didn’t consider how much curl takes away from length.

8. Combed the hair while wet.

9. Used a small round brush to blow dry.

10. Used no product.

Now you know what NOT to do, use the education and suggestions in this issue and other texture education to focus on all the positive things you can do to be a curl expert and total beauty resource for your clients!

Read the digital version of Texture!

Innovation, Creativity on Display in Long Beach

by Michelle Breyer on Friday, February 1st, 2013

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Long Beach, Calif. –

More than five years ago, inventor Nick Johnson was watching all the excitement over the keratin boom. Stylists, including his wife, were excited by the potential to offer their clients an easy way to smooth their hair, and the technique also provided huge revenue potential.

But Johnson also saw the downside. Stylists and their clients often were irritated by the fumes created when the hot flat iron was applied to the keratin formula.

“My wife said ‘You have to invent something,’” Johnson said of his wife Marzia Johnson, who owns the Marzia Salon in San Francisco, Calif. “So I spent two weeks in my workshop inventing a device.”

The result is the Izunami Fume Iron, a device that extracts fumes such as formaldehyde gas, odors, and VOC’s by suctioning the vapors directly through the flat iron into an air purification system.

“I believe this product provides stylists and their clients with peace of mind,” Johnson says.

Right: Izunami fume iron, Left: ISSE

Right: Izunami fume iron, Left: ISSE attendee

Right: Izunami fume iron, Left: ISSE attendee

Stylists got their first look at the Izunami Fume Iron at the Professional Beauty Association’s International Salon & Spa Expo in Long Beach the last weekend in January.

Creativity and innovation were on display throughout the ISSE show, which kicks off the hair show season. Whether it was watching top talents like Nick Arrojo and Martin Parsons show off their cutting and styling skills or looking at some of the newest product developments, stylists had plenty to inspire them.

For those stylists specializing in texture, there were a number of new product introductions, including Yuko’s Anti-Frizz, a gentler version of its straightening product designed to tame frizz rather than eliminate curl. Other standouts include Amika’s new Straight Up Straightening Balm and Haute Mess Texture Gel; Erayba’s HydraKer Keratin & Argan Oil Therapy Line and Neuma Beauty’s NeuSmooth line.

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Right: ISSE attendee, Left: InStyler straightening curls

ISSE Long Beach always has a diverse exhibitor base, and 2013 was no exception. Known as the launch pad for new beauty products and services, ISSE Long Beach 2013 featured amore than 400 beauty brands ranging such industry leaders as Rusk and Farouk Systems to hot brands like Macadamia Natural Oil and Moroccan Natural Oil.

Keratin treatments continued to be a major focus for many companies, although the number of companies has dwindled due to competition and calls for safer products.

If ISSE is a barometer of what 2013 holds for stylists and salons, there is reason for optimism. Many brands said sales were up noticeably from last year.

Paul Mitchell Stylists on Dry and Wet Cutting

by Cassadie on Wednesday, July 18th, 2012

Ah yes, the ever-burning and often polarizing question within the community of stylists who work with curly hair: should curls be cut wet or dry? During The Truth About Curls session at the annual Paul Mitchell Gathering, the artists and educators provided their expert option on the subject matter: curly hair can be cut both ways!

The truth about cutting curls is that a wet cut or a dry cut should depend on the client’s unique texture. Before deciding which cutting technique to employ, a stylist should first discuss how a client typically wears their hair and analyze their texture. Attendees at The Gathering watched how textures with more shrinkage were cut dry using a “stroking” technique to “open up the hair” and create space while other looser textures were clipped wet. Watch how a Platform Artist analyzes and cuts this 3c hair:

The moral of the story is that as a stylist, you have flexibility in how you decide to cut your clients’ curls. Take the time to listen to the client and look at the texture before deciding which technique will work best for each unique curl.

Clipper Cutting Curly Hair

by Ivan Zoot/The Clipper Guy on Friday, September 23rd, 2011

antonio gonzales

Cutting curly hair can be daunting for many hair cutters. Clipper cutting is a great option for curly hair, and your clipper is a great tool for facing these fears. Controlling lengths and creating workable shapes are the goals. Here are my top tips for clipper cutting curly hair.

1. Clipper cut curls dry

Curls expand and distort when hydrated. You will have a better idea of what you are taking, and leaving on the client, if you cut with clippers on dry curly hair. The client will wear their hair dry, so it is better to cut it dry so as to really “see” what you are creating.

2. Leave it longer

When choosing a guide comb, reach for one that is one size larger than your first instinct tells you to pick up. You may be surprised how short curls will clip down. Better to err on the side of too long than too short. After all, we can not put back what we take away.

3. Clip with the growth direction first

Curls will lay down in front of the clipper blade action when cut with the growth direction. This will leave a bit more length, which is what you want. Reverse and cut against the growth direction once you know how these particular curls will respond.

4. Minimize tension

Applying tension to hair stretches out the shape you are working with. Use wide-toothed combs and wide-toothed clipper blades to keep the hair happily in its natural position, state and shape. You will have better control of the shape you are creating if you are not distorting the hair by applying tension. Your hand and your fingers are your best wide-toothed comb.

5. Take large sections

Type 2 (wavy) and type 3 (curly) textures can be condensed into fewer, larger sections for control. This is called condensed cutting. When hair is shifted to a common point to be cut, length increases are created across the shape. Learn to use this concept to create movement within a curly shape. Short hair pushes longer hair. This is a basic principle of all hair cutting. Use this to move hair where you want it to go.

6. Clip and snip

Type 4 (kinky) hair can be individually snipped and clipped one coil at a time for real, wearable shapes. Remember, this hair type gets “short” fast. Take less.

7. Think silhouette

Creating great curly haircuts is about sculpting the overall outer perimeter shape. Step back and assess the balance and proportions of the overall shape.

8. Work from outside to inside

Define the outer boundary of the hair cut shape first. Address hanging length and perimeter lines. Go in and reduce weight, build volume and create shape inside the boundaries once you have set them.

    Try clipper cutting a curly client and share your experiences here. I hope to hear from you and, if you need any advice on the technique, I am here to help.

    Styling Curly Hair: 5 Common Mistakes

    by CurlStylist on Thursday, September 1st, 2011


    Ouidad, Queen of Curls.

    The life of a stylist is fraught with trials, triumphs and many tribulations, especially if you choose to specialize in textured tresses. Yes, some mistakes are inevitable no matter how savvy you are as a stylist — but you may be surprised how many common faux pas are avoidable. And, you don’t need years of experience to figure it out, if you’re willing to learn from the wisdom of those who spent decades creating a brave (and curly) new world.

    Here, we turn to leading curl experts, and asked: If they knew then what they know now, what nostalgic advice would they share about styling curly hair? Read on for the top 5 lessons of curl-centric veterans — lessons they learned the hard way, so you don’t have to.

    1: Set Realistic Expectations

    When Ouidad, the “Queen of Curls,” first started styling curly hair, she acknowledges that her idealism took over.

    “I wanted to change the world with the haircut that I gave them. I wanted to fix it all and change it all,” Ouidad says. “But it’s impossible to take a head of hair and change it all completely at once. What I learned is to really look at the hair, study all the curl patterns, and learn exactly how much curls shrink, each section, and how they fit within each other when you cut. It’s not like cutting straight hair, you can’t just change it all at once.”

    So, instead of having an image of what you think you’re going to do with the client, like change their life, Ouidad encourages up-and-coming stylists to examine the different hair textures, really study them and understand them first.

    2: Listening to Your Client

    “Let the client talk, don’t talk over them. Just observe them,” says Denis DaSilva, co-owner of New York’s Devachan Salon. “You win over people when you agree with them. If you try to disagree, you’ll never win. Agree with them, and then change them a little to the right or left according to what needs to be done, but never say no.”

    No is not a word your clients are going to accept easily. So, experts say, be certain you understand what they want before you react.

    “You’re going to have to really listen,” adds Christo. “You’re going to have to analyze their hair, so you can give them options and ideas.”

    3: Don’t Treat Curly Clients Like Straight-Haired Clients

    Curl experts say you cannot treat curly clients the same way you treat clients with straight hair.

    “Most of the time, people with straight hair will let you do whatever you want,” Christo says. “But with curly clients, you have to take into consideration that she has already tried many things and ended up in your chair because you claim you specialize in curly hair. So you have to live up to those expectations.”

    And that can mean a much longer consultation for new clients. For example, Christo blocks out an hour for new clients. “We want to make sure that person is going to stay with us because we know we have all the solutions for them,” he says.

    He suggests stylists ask themselves if they’re really comfortable styling curly hair. “Anyone can say they do curly hair, but can they really? Or, are they making disasters out there for us to fix?” Christo asks.

    4: Don’t Let Curl-Phobia Get the Best of You

    Although you may feel fear when first approaching curly clients, don’t give in to it.

    “The first 10 years as a stylist, you’re so afraid of clients. When they want what they want, they make you concerned about that. The second ten years, you learn how to present what is better for them, but the end result is they will push you, even though you gave them whatever they wanted,” DaSilva says. “The third ten years, now you’re smarter. You listen, but learn how strategically to put them in a spot where you can always give them more.”

    Especially when it comes to color, DaSilva warns that if you give the client too much control, it will be hard to get it back.

    “I don’t have confrontations with any clients, but if they say I want a lot of blonde highlights, I’ll put the blonde strategically in places where they will see more blonde, but not necessarily doing more blonde,” he explains. “If they say I want a little red, I may know that warm brown, for them, is red.”

    DaSilva says it’s all about understanding how to interpret and balance a client’s wants and needs.

    5: Communicate

    Curl experts say your words matter a lot when styling curly hair clients.

    “If you say, ‘I know exactly what I need to do,’ it just blows up in your face. Even if you do know, it just puts [the curly client] on the defense,” Ouidad says. “It’s essential to talk about how you’re going to work with the hair, what kind of movement you want to put in the hair. You want to be able to verbalize and explain how it’s going to fit and how it’s going to look like when the hair is dry.”

    Ouidad says you can ease a curly’s fear by saying things like, “I know layers would be too rough for your hair, or it would shrink too much.” You really want to make sure curly clients know that you’re not going to give them ledges, a pyramid or some other shape they dread — and that you understand their texture.

    “Make your client as comfortable and be trusting as possible by saying things that resonate with them,” Ouidad says.

    Read all of this bi-annual issue of Texture!

    How to Cut Curly Hair

    by Kateri Johnson on Thursday, August 18th, 2011

    Before You Begin

    When cutting curly hair, my first suggestion is to gauge the actual curl pattern in its natural state. During the initial contact, whether it be in person or over the phone, it is important that you request the client come in with dry hair, in the style that they would like to, or usually, wear their hair.

    Many times, curlies come in with wet, pulled back hair. This creates a few problems. Curly hair should be cut dry in most cases. As we all know, having the hair wet changes the elasticity of the hair and is the primary culprit for shrinkage after the cut, the one thing all curlies are afraid of.

    If the hair is pulled back into a pony, the hair on the surface is not only dry but it is molded into the straight position it was drawn back into. In addition, the center of the hair is damp, creating two different areas of elasticity.

    With the hair in the preferred position for the client, you are able to see the heavy areas, areas of multiple texture, mistakes from previous services and the general overall shape of the previous cut or outgrowth.

    During the initial meeting with your client, determine the products being used and past chemical services performed, professional or self-administered. Because you will be doing a dry cut, knowledge of any potential product build up, previous coloring or past damage should be taken into account when determining actual hair texture.

    All of these factors will alter texture, creating a false image of curl pattern, hydration and elasticity. A clarifier is often needed after a cut to ensure that the curl product you use to highlight the finished cut is allowed to properly perform.

    Now is the time to explain to your client what the proper products needed to maintain curl formation are, and how to hydrate the hair. With so many wonderful product lines on the market today, assess who your current curl clientele is and try out different companies to find the right fit.

    Newsflash: Drastic Cut Not Needed

    Curly hair does not always need a full cut! My favorite saying is, “We get bigger before we get longer,” meaning our hair gains volume before we gain length. Initially, the first cut may include shortening or dusting the length and trimming or correcting the layers.

    Once you have established your first cut, another full haircut may not be necessary. When a client wants to grow their hair out, alternating between trimming length and layers should be done.

    The area of the hair that receives the most damage is the outside surface and layers of the hair. The area of length, which is the nape area from below the occipital to the base hairline, does not receive as much of a beating. What is always perceived as damaged or dry is the outer surface.

    During the cut, the hair will become very big and very frizzy, which is great! While cutting, the hair is forming its silhouette. This makes it easy to see any heavy areas, ledges or blending points. You can see smooth lines forming, perfect curves and roundness. All of this is invisible during a cut when the hair is wet. Dry, the hair’s elasticity is balanced and there is no room for error due to shrinkage.

    Take a Hair Razor to Those Curls

    by Antonio Gonzales on Monday, August 8th, 2011

    antonio gonzales

    I was born in Trinidad in the height of a hurricane. I spent my childhood surrounded by the sights and sounds and smells of Carnival and the other Indian, African and Spanish festivals of the Islands. Loving the amazing costumes, I got my start dressing my sisters and doing their hair and makeup. An opportunity came up to work with Trinidad’s leading costume designers, makeup artists and hair stylists. After I left the Island, my career evolved with work in Munich, Los Angeles and now New York City. Here in New York, I am a stylist at the Orlo Salon in the Meat Packing district. Vogue magazine recently named me as one of the rising hairstylist stars in N.Y., I was awarded the best haircut of 2008 by shecky’s.com, Gotham Magazine called me a Shear Genius and Allure Magazine featured me as one of the best cuts 2009.

    See Antonio’s blog here.

    I am excited to address this topic because I know that there seems to be a rule forbidding us to use a hair razor on curls, but as hairstylists, the one thing we know is true, is that rules are broken all the time!

    First, let me remind you of two things:

    1. Creative people should never limit themselves by convention.
    2. Creative people should never be lemmings.

    Countless articles and videos featuring hairstylists swearing the razor should never be used on curly hair, wet (or dry) are boring and just plain wrong.

    I have seen so many hairstylists in salons do incredible work on curly hair delivering happy clients and flawless results. So let’s blow away (pun intended) any negative myths about the hair razor now.

    Don’t get me wrong, I have met many clients who have had very bad experiences with the razor, and I really felt their pain. But I have also met many with destroyed hair from highlights. Perhaps it is the hairstylist and not the tool or product that creates a bad look.

    Why Use a Hair Razor?

    Individuality is the most important asset any woman possesses, and curly hair can be her crowning glory. It’s an amazing canvas to work with and each head should be treated with individuality in mind. You have the amazing ability to make her feel like the best version of herself. So, what a pity it is to only consider using one tool to cut her curly hair.

    Hair Razors From the Past

    Scissors haven’t always been the only game in town! At the beginning of my career, I was taught to use the feather razor. You know, the one with the guard?

    I remember thinking I had discovered the moon with this tool, but was petrified by it. Years later, I can say the only time I use this razor is to rid the neck of fine hairs.

    Since then, they have created similar razors to the feather, some with a built in comb and some made from heavier materials. Today, you couldn’t pay me enough money to use the feather razor or any heavy tool to cut hair.

    What Razor Should You Use?

    It makes all the difference in the world to use the right razor, not only for the right hair type but the right one for you as an artist.

    The wooden handle straight blade is what I use on a daily basis. This razor is also what is used to shave the face – it’s that sharp! I get mine from Classicshaving.com. They are great supporters of hairstylists with great service.

    It does not have a guard, which allows for easy movement on the hair shaft with ultimate creativity.

    Feather razors have a guard in place to prevent cutting yourself, but it also limits your creativity and it’s almost impossible to not have the scraping effect. It also limits the way you cut hair because you don’t have use of the full razor blade. For me, it’s like having scissors, but only being able to use one blade.

    What Can a Razor Do That Others Can’t?

    With scissors we can slide cut, point cut and all the other techniques. If we are in a hurry, we can take thinning shears, but neither of these tools can do what a hair razor can.

    On curly hair, the straight razor is the most delicate haircutting tool you will ever use. It’s precise, gentle touch on the hair allows you to create layers, remove bulk and build graduation without blunt edges like the scissors. But, like anything else in life, everything in moderation!

    The only razor I use on my clients is the straight razor by Creative Razors. A practice of mine is to never use the razor on the same client cut after cut. If it’s a client that comes three times a year, then I say go for it. Otherwise, I use scissors in between to touch up the haircut.

    I feel the hair does not grow fast enough to warranty razor cut after razor cut. It’s important to leave the hair with some density for the client to manage. For us, it’s easy to blow-dry any cut, but for the client it can be difficult to manage the wispy ends.

    When Not to Use a Razor

    Like any other tool, this has to be used in the hands of someone who knows how to use them. It’s important to let common sense guide you in knowing when the razor is too aggressive.

    Ego is another thing to be aware of when using the razor. Always keep in mind that it’s not your hair and your client is by no means a hairstylist.

    I’ve seen hairstylists talk clients into a razor cut even when the client pleads with them not to. If the client is panicking, it’s a sure enough sign you should put the razor down and pick up the scissors.

    Know When to Put it Down

    Extremely fine hair should not be cut with the razor, and if you have a client that wants a more classic hair style and says, “I like my hair heavy without too many layers,” then that’s your cue to put down the darn razor!

    If you don’t know how to use the razor, then find out where you can go and get the needed education. Once this talent is acquired, you will become a versatile, effective stylist.

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