Natural Hair Tips

by Claire Aviles on Wednesday, August 1st, 2012

There’s a major need for stylists in the “natural hair world.” While there are salons specifically catered to naturalistas, the natural hair movement has thus far been dominated by consumer culture. The themes of freedom and self-acceptance that the movement embodies have primarily been spread through online message boards, blogs, and YouTube.

These tips from Design Essentials® Master Educators Deshonica Kerrie and Francesca Adams will help stylists navigate the growing movement and confidently serve their clients with natural hair.

1. What are some tips to help women transition from relaxed to natural hair?

We suggest wearing protective styles while transitioning. Experiment with sets, twists and braided styles. These styles are limitless and can also help give the illusion that your client’s curl pattern is consistent while she is growing out the straighter parts of her hair. Another great option is the Design Essentials® Strengthening Therapy System (STS), which offers clients the freedom to go back and forth between straight and naturally curly styles without damaging the natural curl pattern while minimizing damage and tangling.

2. Why should I recommend that my clients use a sulfate-free shampoo?

The chemical sulfate often used in shampoos to help cleanse and create the lather is harsh on the scalp and removes natural oils from the hair. To maintain a healthy scalp, we recommend using a sulfate-free gentle cleansing shampoo with a blend of natural ingredients like soy or botanical oils. The sulfate-free shampoo will cleanse the scalp, while replenishing the moisture needed by the scalp and hair. Remember, a healthy scalp promotes healthy hair!

3. Can natural hair return to its natural curl pattern after being straightened?

If you continually straighten the hair using 450-degree heat, the hair eventually will not return to its natural kinky, curly state. To maintain the natural curl pattern of the hair, first examine the texture to determine if its fine, medium or coarse and will hold up to the heat used when straightening regularly. Second, make sure to lower the temperature of the straightening tool when silking the hair. Understanding the texture and curl pattern will also help when choosing products to use on the hair.

4. What can stylist do to retain natural hair clients?

First, it is important to understand that natural clients will likely visit their hair stylist less frequently. However, when natural clients do come in, they typically desire more services during that one visit. As a professional stylist, it’s important that you continuously educate yourself on natural hair care and are able to share information with your natural clients that they can’t easily get from YouTube bloggers. When consulting with your natural clients, be sure to not only to talk to them about the health of their hair, but to also provide services such as a trim or steam treatment and retail products to help them maintain their hair at home in between visits.

5. What can a stylist do to position him/herself as a trusted natural hair stylist?

As we know, naturalistas turn to YouTube to discover the latest products, trends and styling tutorials for natural hair. In order to position yourself as a natural hair expert, you should not only educate yourself, but also make sure that you are sharing useful information where the consumers are searching. We suggest producing your own YouTube videos with styling or maintenance tutorials. Stylists should also make sure to have an updated website with links where your clients can find you on social media. Be sure to post rich content regularly. Along with your routine networking efforts, stylists should connect with local, industry specific meet-up groups.

Wash and Go Styling Tips

by Claire Aviles on Tuesday, July 17th, 2012

With this summer’s hot and humid weather, naturalistas everywhere are seeking simple styles that keep them cool and their coils looking healthy.

Here are some tips from Design Essentials Master Educators Deshonica Kerrie and Francesca Adams. They will help anyone achieve the right conditions for cool, funky wash and go styling.

Wash and Go Shampooing Basics

Always detangle from ends to root before shampooing to release the coils and make the shampoo process easier.

Detangle with either Design Essentials HCO Leave-In Conditioner or Hydrate Leave-In Hydrating Conditioner before shampooing.

If you experience knotting at the ends of the hair when trying to detangle, use a cream-based conditioner and use your fingers to loosen the knots before shampooing.

Remove hair build-up without stripping the hair by shampooing with Design Essentials Organic Cleanse Deep Conditioning Shampoo, followed by the sulfate-free Design Essentials Natural Curl Cleanser Shampoo.

Wash and Go Conditioning Basics
One of the challenges with wash and go hair is quickly styling before seeing frizz or shrinkage. Here are some tips to ensure adequate moisture and ample time to style.

Use a hydrating leave-in conditioner, such as Design Essentials Natural Moisturizing Conditioner, for achieving more volume along with a daily moisturizing agent, such as Design Essentials Natural Daily Moisturizing Lotion, for achieving more definition as a base before using a curl enhancing product such as Design Essentials.

With these tips you can achieve a fabulous wash and go style that clients will step out of the salon raving about!

The 2012 NAHA Awards

by Claire Aviles on Wednesday, June 27th, 2012

Jose Julian Macias Navarro-NAHA Finalist: Texture / Photographer: Sergio Castro

This month, the North American Hairstyling Awards (NAHA) will celebrate the top hairstylists and beauty professionals in the industry.

NAHA, which will be held in Las Vegas on July 22, is the most prestigious photographic beauty competition in North America. Individuals are recognized in thirteen different categories, from Newcomer of the Year and Avant-Garde to one of our favorites, Texture.

E! News anchor Giuliana Rancic, named the 2012 PBA Beautiful Humanitarian Honoree, will host the NAHA Awards Ceremony this year. “I am thrilled to host the 2012 North American Hairstyling Awards,” Rancic said. “Beauty professionals are at the heart of making people look and feel their best, and I’m excited to be a part of this amazing event,” says Giuliana.

NAHA is part of PBA Beauty Week, North America’s most inclusive beauty event, offering networking, education and professional growth opportunities to all sectors of the beauty industry. PBA Beauty Week is produced by the Professional Beauty Association and is held in cooperation with Cosmoprof North America.

Check out the NAHA website to see more amazing photographs. You can also find information about attending the event.

Following is a list of the NAHA categories and finalists.

Avant-Garde
Chrystofer Benson and Tawnya Nelson
Nicholas French
Jose Julian Macias Navarro
Jake Thompson
Chris Vandehey

Contemporary Classic
Dimitrios Tsioumas
Daniel Holzberger
Nick Stenson
Rusty Phillips
Sal Misseri

Editorial Hairstylist of the Year
Charlie Price
Vivienne Mackinder and Sue Pemberton
Steve Elias
Neeko Abriol
Michael Albor and Donna Hamilton

Haircolor
Dimitrios Tsioumas
Nick Stenson
Chad Demchuk
Sue Pemberton
Jacqueline Sanchez

Hairstylist of the Year
Allen Ruiz
Liz Nevin
DJ Riggs
Dimitrios Tsioumas
Alain Pereque

Make-Up Artist of the Year
Clarissa Luna
Jeanne San Diego
Ericka Brannon
Sevan Tatoulian
David Maderich

Master Hairstylist of the Year
Edwin Johnston
Tony Ricci
Dusty Simington
Anna Pacitto
Eric Fisher

Newcomer of the Year
Valeria Amirova
Sal Misseri
Ray Hornback
Jasmine Gibbs
Nick Hemsley

Salon Design of the Year
Headlines The Salon
Ginger Bay Salon & Spa
Square Colour Salon + Spa
Bespoke Hair Artisans
Studio So Lara

Salon MBA
Rejuvenation Spa
Gila Rut Salon
Mane Attraction Salon
Zazou Salon & Spa
Blo

Salon Team of the Year
Lunatic Fringe Salon
A Michael Levine Salon Group
HAUS Salon
Salon Keiji
MAINENTRANCE Artists

Student Hairstylist of the Year
Nicole Higgens
Quinn Sorensen
Alisha Sutch
Cameron Jones
Cassandra Monteyro

Texture
Liz Nevin
Jasmine Gibbs
Amy Freudenberg
Jose Julian Macias Navarro
Richie Roman

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